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Wing Luke Museum
Id#NameDescription
1996.004.003 Plastic Bags White plastic bags from Ying Hei Restaurant. Each bag has printed in red lettering, "Ying Hei Restaurant Barbecue Pork & Roast Duck - To Go/Famous chinese Dishes/664 King St. So. Seattle, Washington 98104/Phone; 622-4229" and an image of a pig on a tray. The top of the bag has three Chinese characters (Ying Hei Restaurant) and text in Chinese to advertise the business.
1996.004.004 Chopsticks Two pairs of chopsticks in yellow paper wrappers from Ying Hei Restaurant. The bamboo chopsticks are in paper wrappers with red printed lettering, "Ying Hei Restaurant/Famous Chinese Dishes/664 King St. S. Seattle, WA/622-4229." The restaurant logo, a building with traditional pagoda-style roof encircled in a crackled border is at the top of the paper wrapper. Three Chinese characters are printed below Ying Hei Restaurant. Each chopstick is made from bamboo and is printed with metallic red lettering "Ying Hei Restaurant" and three Chinese characters. A. yellow paper wrapper B. chopstick C. chopstick D. yellow paper wrapper E. chopstick F. chopstick
1996.004.005 Sign Round, clear plexiglass sign with single, large, orange plastic Chinese character, from Ying Hei Restaurant. The character is the word for congee or juk (zhou: rice soup). Two holes near the top were used for hanging purposes.
1996.004.006 Sign Round, clear plexiglass sign with single, large, orange plastic Chinese character, from Ying Hei Restaurant. The character is the word for noodles (mian). Two holes near the top were used for hanging purposes. Metal hanging wire still remains attached.
1996.004.007 Sign Clear plexiglass sign with red lettering from Ying Hei Restaurant A single vertical rectangular sheet of plexi has red plastic letters glued to it and reads, "Closed Thur. At 4:00 p.m./ NO Credit Cards and Personal Checkls Accepted.
1996.004.008 Sign Square white plastic sign with four red Chinese characters, from Ying Hei restaurant. A single sheet of white plexi has red plastic characters glued to it (qian ri gong ying--special dishes served all day?). Two holes at each vertical edge may have been used for hanging purposes. The sign is rather grungy from food stains and masking tape residue.
1996.004.009 Sign Square white plastic sign with four red Chinese characters, from Ying Hei restaurant. A single sheet of white plexi has red plastic characters glued to it (xingqi mei dian--weekly specials?). Two holes at each vertical edge may have been used for hanging purposes. The sign is rather grungy from food stains and masking tape residue.
1996.004.010 Sign White square plastic sign with red lettering, from Ying Hei Restaurant A single sheet of white plexi has red plastic letters glued to it and reads, "Hours: 11:30 a.m. to 10:30 p.m." Two holes on each vertical edge may have been used for hanging purposes. On the front is evidence of masking tape residue and dirty smudges. The back is covered with sticky residue.
1996.005 Drill Team Hats & Uniforms Set of Chinese American girls Drill Team Costumes including Hats, Shirts, Over Bodice, Pants, Skirt, Belt, Cuffs. A: One Headdress, H: 7.25", Dia: 6", Red silk covered head band stiffened with card board, has seven tongue like projections pointing upwards and two comma shaped projection pointing downward at each side. The projections are wired for stiffness and two end ones have been rewired to the sides of the head band. The head band has seven scalloped shapes long the front bottom edge. The band, scallops and the comma shaped ear flaps are covered with sequins and outlined in red braid stitched with white thread. Each tongue like projection has two red synthetic fiber pompoms attached with curled wire creating a spring like base. The inside of the head dress is covered with silver paper which is coming off in places. A fastening at the back of the head band which was probably a piece of elastic is missing. This may have been the leader' hat since there is only one. B - N: 13 Headdresses, H: 6", Dia: 6", Red colored red satin head band, narrows towards the back and has seven tongue like projections extending from top pf head band and two comma shaped projections hanging down on each side near the ears. The head band has seven flowers made of red mesh braid forming the petals which have small brilliants glued to their edges. And a clear plastic bead in the center. Along the lower edge of the band mesh braid forms a line of petals and brilliants. These are trimmed with a white and silver mesh braid. Above this is a yellow curled fringe band. The coma shaped ear flaps which are wired to the head band have two similar flowers and are outlined with yellow braid stitched with white thread. The tongue like projections are decorated with similar larger flowers with out brilliants. All the flowers are formed with wire and attached to the head dress with wire. The inside of the stiffened head dress is covered with silver paper. The back ends of the head band are fastened with a piece of black elastic. All but D and L show the remains of yellowish foam band on the inside of the head band. A has a safety pin on the back elastic some brilliants are missing from the flowers. . D the elastic is missing. F has the remains of masking tape on the inside. G has a split in the headband near the front. H has a strip of masking tape where the foam was held in place. I the elastic is stitched on with white thread. K has a bobby pin attached to the elastic. L the elastic has been shortened with stitches. M the elastic has been shortened with a tuck. O - V: Eight Shirts, H: 27.25, W: 60", synthetic red satin long blouse has long sleeves cut in one with an extension at the lower end of the sleeves. Sleeves are gathered with elastic at the wrist. The blouse is cut so that it narrows at the waist and there are vents on each side a the bottom. There is a stand up collar which is decorated with silver sequins and metallic thread in a wave like design . The satin band is added to the left front which fastens with six snap fasteners. There are French seams and biased tape binding on the inside. O has additional line of pink sequins around top edge of collar, and there are brownish marks on the front; P has the initials K E embroidered in black on inside back collar and a twill tape tab is sewn below this, there is a hook and eye closing on the collar. Q has the letter "L" written in black ink on inside upper back; R same as Q and has a twill tape tab sewn at the bottom collar; S had a piece of adhesive tape stuck to inside back collar with name Kathy Chinn written in ink. The letter "S" is written in ink on upper back and hook and eye closing at the collar; T has the remains of tape on inside back collar; U has hook and eye closing at the collar and has white spots on front and back (bird droppings?); V There was masking tape label stuck to inside back collar with the Name "Lander Wong" written in ink. The tape has been removed. W - Y: Three Over bodices, L: 20", W: 17", Red silk bodices decorated with silver sequins and bugle beads. The front and back of the bodice have scalloped edges which narrow towards the waist. The neck is finished with red silk binding. The bodice is lined with lighter red synthetic material interlined with coarse lined material. And has brown interfacing. There are six snap fasteners down the back.The sequin decoration has three large glowers and leaves in the center of the front and back surrounded at the neck and sides with bands of smaller flowers and tendrils. W: frayed at the shoulders and reinforced with red zig zag stitching. Inside the front at the neck is remains of masking tape. X: Frayed at the shoulders and reinforced with red zig zag stitching. Inside the front at the neck is remains of masking tape. A woven cloth label on the front inside neck has Th e manufacturers name "Wah Mee Co. embroidery 182, Tung Choi St. 2nd Fl." with Chinese Characters on both sides. Y: A woven cloth label on the front inside neck has Th e manufacturers name "Wah Mee Co. embroidery 182, Tung Choi St. 2nd Fl." with Chinese Characters on both sides, below the label is piece of adhesive tape with name "Cookie Chinn" printed in blue ink. On the back band to which the snap fasteners are attached a company name "Foo Wah H.K. " is woven all along one edge. The silk is frayed at the shoulders and it has not been repaired. Z - EE, six pairs of red synthetic satin pants, H: 34", W: 25", wide legged pants with ane elastic encased waist and ankles. Cut I n four pieces. Some of the pants had masking or adhesive tapes labels with names on them. These have been removed. The names include: "Staci, Kaylene, Lilian, Maryanne, Suemay, Jolene Tom, Angela Chan, Doreen Eng". Z: Marilyn Chin written in ink, on adhesive tape attached to the inside back. AA: the name Kathy Chinn is written on adhesive tape on inside back. The ankles are frayed. BB the name Karen W. is embroidered ion inside waistband. The pants are stained. CC: the crotch is worn through. DD: The holes in the legs and crotch have been repaired with zig zag stitching and an iron on patch. EE: There is a hole in the crotch and repairs made by insetting pieces of satin. FF - JJ: five red silk satin skirt panels, H: 31.5", W: 26.5", Each skirt panel consists of a cotton waist band with 15 - 3" wide panels hanging from it. Each has two sections. The top section ends in a point extending half way down the panel. From this point and to each side hang three red silk frayed tassels. The bottom section also ends in a point and there are sequined motifs on the bottom of the upper and lower sections. The motifs consist of semi - circular lines resembling waves with a flame like shape rising above out lines in silver bugle beads and filled with gold sequins.Panels are lined with lighter weight red material and the skirt panels are tied on with white cotton cord. knotted through loops on each end of the waist band. FF: Panels are all frayed at the top and four panels have large holes in them. On the inside of the waist band the name Joyce Law was written on masking tape which has been removed. GG: Panels are frayed at the top and large hole in one of them. HH: Panels are frayed at the top and large hole in one of them. Has red zizg zag stitching reinforcing ten panels at the top , "Angela Chan" written in ink on masking tape which has been removed. II: Panels are frayed at the top and large hole in three of them. In two places on the front band the number 32 is written in black ink. Some of the tassels the red dye has been bleached out. JJ: Frayed at the top holes in two panels, four panels have been reinforced with red zig zag stitching at the top. KK - NN: Four red synthetic satin belts, L: 30.5", W: 2.5", Straight belts which have been stiffened are lined with red cotton and decorated with wavy lines with silver and gold sequins. The ends can be fastened together with two sets of flat hooks and eyes, KK: At one end additional sequins have been added with white stitching s the belt could be used by larger person. LL: At one end the belt is undecorated and has two sets of snap fasteners so the belt can fit a smaller person. MM: Two sets of black hooks and eyes located for a medium sized person. On the inside the name "Joyce Law" was written on masking tape which has been removed. NN: Has silver and red sequins added to one end and three sets of eyes with one set of hooks so belt can be adjusted. On the inside written in ink is the name "Sue May Eng". OO - BBB: Seven Pairs of cuffs, H: 6.5", W: 9", right and left hand cuffs made of red synthetic satin lined with red cotton. Designed with a wide band at the bottom and a semicircular piece at the top which lays flat until it is wrapped around the wrist and fastened with three sets of snap fasteners. There are two four petaled flowers outlined with bugle beads and filled with gold sequins. Silver sequin tendrils and borders encircle the flowers. OO: Missing some tendrils and has two sets of hooks and eyes to make cuffs smaller. PP: some sequins missing from tendrils revealing coarse white thread. QQ: Some sequin tendrils are missing, and has white residue from adhesive tape. RR: The name Sandra Lee written in ink on scotch tape which has been removed. SS: three snap fasteners have been moved to make cuffs smaller.On the upper back written in ink on the lining is "Left". The names Fannie Tam and Doreen Eng were written on masking tape which has been removed from the back. TT: Part of the lower flower is missing and the outline of bugle beads is also missing. UU: some sequin tendrils are missing and the upper sequin border is loose. VV: Extra extension has been added to one side of the cuff. WW & XX Some sequin tendrils are missing and the remains of adhesive tape has been left on the back.YY Adhesive tape residue on the back.ZZ: some sequins are missing from a tendril on the front revealing the white cord beneath. AAA: Parts of lower flower are missing. BBB: Sequins are missing from the tendrils revealing white thread beneath.
1996.006.001 Menu, Postcards A: Menu from Bush Garden Japanese Restaurant (February 1977) B: Postcard depicting people dining in a tatami room at the Bush Garden Restaurant, 2 waitresses in kimono, bright yellow tablecloth C: Postcard depicting diners in a tatami room at the Bush Garden Restaurant, 2 waitresses in kimono, white tablecloth
1996.006.002 Flyer Flyer Rectangular lavender card advertising Main Tailors, written in English and Japanese
1996.006.003 Ticket Pawnshop Ticket From T. Shimizu's Loan Office, pink, receipt for $2, 1931
1996.006.004 Financial Statement Financial Statement From Mutual Savings and Loan Assn., dated March 8, 1921
1996.006.005 Pamphlet Pamphlet Member's list for the Seattle Japanese Hotel and Apartment Assn., 1961
1996.006.006 Directory Chinese Business Directory Booklet of Seattle and Vicinity, 1949, 64 pp.
1996.006.007 Directory Booklet: Northwest Japanese American Directory, 1956, 76 pp.
1996.006.008 Program A: Program for football game between University of Washington and Whitman College, 1929 B: Sheet of Paper, one side has pictures of 3 boys playing game, other has Chinese handwriting
1996.006.009 Menus 8 Menus from Tenkatsu Restaurant, Seattle (2 pink, 6 yellow)
1996.006.010 Menu Menu from New Cathay Restaurant, Portland
1996.006.011 Menus 2 Menus from Louie's Chinese Garden Restaurant, Seattle (1 solid brown, 1 brown & white patterned)
1996.006.012 Menu Menu from Twin Dragon Chinese Cafe, Seattle
1996.006.013 Menu Menu from China Pheasant Restaurant (holiday meal - a la carte)
1996.006.014 Menus 8 Menus from the Chinese Garden Restaurant, Seattle (1 for a New Year's meal, 7 regular menus--2 beige, 2 yellow, 1 orange, 1 grey, 1 white)
1996.006.015 Menus, Receipts 6 Menus for Chinese Gardent Restaurant, Seattle (some have labels with names of companies) 31 Receipts from various companies tucked inside menus
1996.006.016 Ticket Admission Ticket for Century's Rheinlander Beer Dance, 1934
1996.006.017 Business Card Business Card for the Berkley Rooms, furnished apartments and rooms, Portland, Ore.
1996.006.018 Business Card Business Card for the West Hotel, Portland, Ore.
1996.006.019 Business Card Business Card for Wherrie Tailoring Co., 1934, Oregon City, Oregon Calendar printed on reverse
1996.006.020 Business Card Business Card for Berger Tailoring Co., Seattle Handwritten note on reverse
1996.006.021 Business Card Business Card for China Cab Co., Seattle Driver's name: Wing or Hing
1996.006.022 Business Card Business Card for Swayne & Hoyt, Ltd., Shipowners and Agents
1996.006.023 Business Card Business Card for Rhodes Photography Studio (4 poses 10c 4 photos)
1996.006.024 Business Card Business Card for Dr. Evans, Doctor for Men Reverse side: free admission to Museum of Anatomy
1996.006.025 Card Card: Political advertisement "Re-Elect Don H. Evans County Commissioner"
1996.006.026 Business Card Business Card for Pacific Outfitting Co. Inc., Seattle "Correct Apparel for Men, Young Men and Boys"
1996.006.027 Business Card 2 Business Cards for Gordon Radio & Elec. Co., Seattle
1996.006.028 Business Card 2 Business Cards for the Ruth Hotel, Seattle
1996.006.029 Business Card 2 Business Cards for Service Cab Co., Seattle One card has new tel. no. stamped in red ink One card has writing in English and Chinese on reverse Driver's name on both is Charlie
1996.006.030 Calling Card 3 Visiting Cards of Henry K. Locke (no other text) May be Henry Kay Lock, see p. 41 of "Reflections of Seattle's Chinese Americans" book (brother of Jeni Fung)
1996.006.031 Business Card 3 Business Cards for V.O. Navea, Pacific Outfitting Company
1996.006.032 Business Card 3 Business Cards of the Don Ting Cafe, Seattle Handwritten notes on reverse of cards
1996.006.033 Business Card 3 Business Cards of the American Oriental Cab Co., Seattle
1996.006.034 Business Card 4 Business Cards from the Swallow Inn, Portland, Ore. 4 Business Cards from Chinese Garden Restaurant, Seattle
1996.006.035 Business Card Business Card for M. Rosenberg, Proprietor One side: M-R Loan Office, other side M-R Loan and Jewelry Co.
1996.006.036 Business Card 5 Business Cards for The Skyhi
1996.006.037 Business Card Business Card for Riverside Inn, Seattle
1996.006.038 Business Card 8 Business Cards for the Canton Cafe, Seattle
1996.006.039 Paper Bags 2 Paper Bags from Rhodes Ten Cent Store smaller one brown striped apper larger one plain brown paper
1996.006.040 Flyer Business Flyer for the City Loan Co. designed to look like a dollar bill
1996.006.041 Menu Menu for restaurant serving Chinese and Western food no name on menu
1996.006.042 Menu Menu for Tik-Tok Drive In, Portland, Ore.
1996.006.043 Menu Menu for China Pheasant's Special Christmas Dinner, 1940
1996.006.044 Print Print Picture of opulently dressed man; red, blue and black ink on very thin paper, over the man's head in Chinese is written "His mortality is equal to the Heaven and the Earth"
1996.006.045 Calling Cards A: Rectangular scarlet paper, black Chinese calligraphy, on reverse is written "Card of the Shaowu (?) Magistrate who helped the Christians and was himself attacked by a mob B: Red rectangular envelope, black Chinese calligraphy, on reverse "Calling card of the Minister to Austria" C: Red rectangular paper, black Chinese calligraphy, on reverse "Brigadier General Song Sung Do Ing" D: Red rectangular paper, black Chinese calligraphy, on reverse "Mim (?) Magistrate Nong Guok Suoi" E: Pink rectangular paper, black Chinese calligraphy F: Red rectangular paper, black Chinese calligraphy G: Pink rectangular paper, black Chinese calligraphy, on reverse "His Excellency Kung Sing Tung Taotai of the Foreign Board" (brown paper glued to front)
1996.006.047 Calendar
1996.006.212 Book Book, "New Dictionary" written by C'hu Tsu mo in 1914. 4th Edition published in Shanghai in 1916. It has string binding, written in Chinese, illustrations, some writing in English on measurements. No back cover, corners dog-eared, pages warped.
1996.006.213 Book Book, pocket size, book of poetry on Daoist ideas. Written in Chinese with brush pen, pen and ink drawings, 148 pages, some blank pages, last page upside down, cover has red stamp title that is faded, pages are curling, cover is torn. Book is from Chang Wah-kee.
1996.006.234 Tack Box of Tacks Black cardboard box with yellow label on one end. Label reads: "6 oz., 250, Steel, Carpet Tacks." Box is half full.
1996.006.253 Book Book, Diary written in Japanese, cover says "Diary 2597." Inside is western calendar for the year 1937. Cover is blue and spotted and marred. Spots and discoloration on front cover and the cover is tearing. Inside cover shows drawing of a bull, and a few entries have been made in Japanese. Some pages have been torn out.
1996.006.254 Notebook Notebook A Student's notebook for vocabulary building and dictation. Some writing in Chinese but most in English. Written on lined notebok paper. In a three ring binder with black faux leather cover. Embossed is "Scholastic" and on the inside cover is "Scholastic Registered, S. H. Kress & Co., A-13894"
1996.006.341 Chinese herb flavored tea inside small orange and green box. Yuen Kut Lam Hong Kong.
1996.006.342 Box Gum Wall tea in an orange and green tea box, small rectangular. From Fo Town Canton, China
1996.006.344 Stamp 84 - wood and rubber stamps used to mark documents. Many business stanps as well as shipping stamps for day and night time and various amounts of money.
1996.006.345 Button Lapel pin button of a star with one Chinese character and the number 230 inside the star. Red, yellow, blue, white and black bordering the star.
1996.006.346 Bottle Ink bottle with black ink inside, cover doubles as applicator, used apparently for stamp pads.
1996.007 Sari Sari Polyester, machine woven length of cloth; teal blue with gold metallic thread. Warp threads are teal and weft threads are black. Selvedge edges are decorated with 4 1/2 inch wide floral motif bands of gold metallic thread. An ovoid floral motif, approximately 4 inches by 3 inches, is repeated in four staggered rows to decorate the fabric symmetrically. Two gold thread stripes, composed of four narrower stripes, are spaced approximately three inches apart at one end, parallel to the weft. Eight wider stripes are similarly woven at the opposite end. The repeated floral pattern forms a medallion shape composed of two four-petaled flowers, one five-petaled flower, two large leaves and other foliage. The floral band at each selvedge edge is parallel to the warp and consists of a repeated single flower surrounded by two broad leaves and two smaller, heart-shaped leaves. The floral band is bordered by one rope-like stripe on the selvedge side and two on the interior edge. The outer border of the decorative band consists of an interlocking foliage stripe, also parallel to the warp. The burning of loose weft threads confirmed that the fabric was polyester and not silk as suspected by the donor.
1996.008 Doll Set Two Dolls in Bamboo Wheeled Becak .1 A - Male stuffed cloth doll, L: 28.5", W: 8:, D 6", beige cotton face and body with white cotton faggot stitching for joints; face has embroidered features, black eyebrows, eyelids, brown iris and white eyes, pink nose and mouth; traditional batik cotton turban in brown, blue and white design is stitched to head; traditional batik cotton sarong in brown, blue and white butterfly design within diamond shaped grid (folded end of sarong should go between legs and fasten behind), sewn to doll at waist .1 B - Black synthetic velvet jacket with gold colored applied braid around edges, opens in front and a sewn in tab is fastened with a small safety pin, high in back, stand-up collar .1C - Black synthetic velvet belt with gold colored applied braid around edges, fastened with safety pins .2 A - Female stuffed cloth doll, L: 27", W: 8:, D: 8:, beige cotton face and body with white cotton faggot stitching for joints; face has embroidered features, black eyebrows, eyelids, brown iris and white eyes, pink nose and red mouth; black yarn upswept hair done up in back in a bun which has a black net and two black u-shaped hair pins to hold it in place; traditional batik cotton sarong in brown, blue and white butterfly design within diamond shaped grid (folded end of sarong could go between legs and fasten behind), sewn to doll at waist .2 B - Black synthetic velvet jacket with gold colored applied braid around edges, opens wide in front and has a square front insert joining the two front edges of the jacket which is turned back to form a collar, it is fastened with small safety pins under the collar down the front .2 C - Black synthetic velvet cumberbund underneath jacket is fastened with safety pins .2 D - Gold colored pendant on a chain, pendant in a leaf design with a brilliant stone inset ,2 E, F - Pair of earrings which are gold colored stick pins with a brilliant stone on the end (stuck into doll where ears would be) .3 A,B - Pair of shoes for male doll, L: 4.5", W: 2.5", slipper style made of black synthetic velvet with inner sole of stiff cardboard, sewn with blanket stitches, gold colored braid across top edge .4 A,B - Pair of shoes for female doll, L: 4.75", W: 2", high-heel slipper style, uppers and insole made of black synthetic velvet, uppers glued to carved wood soles .5 A - Sword (Kris) for male doll, L: 9", W" 6" incl. sheath, dark brown lacquered wood carved handle with incised design, metal blade in a traditional wavy shape with ledge shaped top and curl on one edge .5 B - Sheath for sword, carved wood with slot inside for sword, dark brown lacquered top carved into a flared shape, bottom is made of two pieces of wood nailed at bottom and not lacquered .5 C - Gold colored metal cover fits over bottom of sheath, imprinted design on one side .6 A-C - 3 Brass hairpins ( L: 4.75", W: 1") with two long prongs on bottom, coiled metal stems, and tops with 8 metal petals (like palm fronds) with centers of 7 inset brilliant stones .7 A,B - 2 Hair decorations (L: 15", W: 5"), strands of yellow cloth buds, green floral tape stems and 4 petal red ribbon flowers with yellow artificial flower stamens, A has four strands of buds held together at 3 intervals with green tape bars on which are mounted 3 red flowers, end have long tapered bud shapes, B has 1 red flower with 5 strands and 1 loop of yellow buds ending in long tapered bud shapes. .8 - "Becak" Model tricycle pedicab for dolls; made of rattan and reed, front cab consists of a double seat with rail in front, foot tray, wheels on either side with fenders, large roof shaped canopy over top, behind is the driver's seat and the back wheel (stationary) with a fender; large pieces of rattan form the structure held together with split reed and the canopy is a plain weave with double stakes and nailed in place in back.
1996.009.001 Bowl A: Brass bowl with aqua blue cloissone enamel The enamel covers the outside, inside and bottom, leaving the brass exposed at the rim and at the foot, design created by the metal outline has 2 rampant dragons in the clouds around the outside and front view of dragon on the inside, the bottom has a cloud design B: Carved dark brown lacquered carved wood stand Round stand, 6"in diameter, has a flat top with a grooved rim around the edge and an indentation below, around the middle is a rounded pierced leaf design, four small curved legs with splayed feet, "Made in China" label glued to bottom.
1996.009.002 Ginseng Ginseng Root in Box The ginseng root with 5 branches is sewn with red thread to a red cotton velvet covered cardboard; it is stored in a cardboard box the bottom is covered with white paper, has a lip of gold colored paper around bottom edge and has red Chinese characters on the back surrounded by a border; an insert lid (for display purposes) that has a shaped cutout covered with clear cellophane which is coming loose, red, green, and yellow design around cutout; top lid of folded cardboard has a gold colored stamped design of mountains as a background for a large ginseng root, red and black Chinese characters on top and sides, in English "Kirin Ginseng" on top and one side and "The People's Republic of China" on two sides.
1996.009.003 Flower Basket Ikebana Flower Basket A: Tall (nageire style) basket, split bamboo, double plain weave sides tapering inward toward bottom, outside stakes of a lighter color are affixed to sides with twined bamboo strips in four rows, under the rim is a chevron shaped pattern in darker bamboo with another row of twining above, wrapped rim, the foot is made of concentric circles of thick bamboo with a wrapped end and tied to the basket with braided bamboo strips; the handle is a knarled piece of branch which is tied to the rim of the basket with bamboo strips. B: Inner bamboo water holder, one piece of 4" diameter bamboo, H: 10", node in bamboo about 3/4 of the way from top form bottom of vase, striated textured stained brown The inner bamboo water holder indicates this is a basket used for Japanese flower arranging (ikebana)
1996.010.001 Ornament Badger ornaments A & B: Two plastic badger figures, brown with black and white pop-out eyes, two brown disks attached to orange and green cord, fastened to green card, C. C: Green Card with white printed badger and kanji: "Made in Yashima, happy badger couple". Story of Bumbuku Chagama or The Magic Tea Kettle A priest at the Morinji Buddhist temple in Tatebayashi, Kotszke was very fond of the tea ceremony and he often looked for beautiful utensils. He polished an old tea kettle he had found at a second hand shop and put it aside. One day as he was admiring the beautifully shaped kettle he fell asleep. Suddenly the tea kettle sprouted a badger head, tail and legs and began to move around. The priest's pupils next door rushed in when they heard a noise and were astonished to see the badger/tea kettle, but when they woke the priest the kettle resumed its former shape. He did not believe what they told him and that evening he decided to make tea with the tea kettle. The kettle got hotter and hotter as the water heated over the brazier and the kettle quickly turned into a badger and jumped away. When they caught up with the kettle it once again resumed its ordinary shape. Thinking that the kettle must be bewitched, the priest decided to get rid of it. He offered to sell it to a tinker (a junkman who fixes items to resell) for a very cheap price. The tinker asked why he would want to sell such a nice kettle cheaply. The priest answered that he had other kettles. Taking the kettle home the tinker believed he had made an excellent deal. That night the tinker was woken by a voice calling him. He looked up to see a kettle with a badger head, tail and feet. The badger/kettle told him that he was not an ordinary kettle, but a badger who could transform himself into a kettle and his name was Bumbuku (Good Luck). He said he was willing to be of service to the man and that the priest had not understood his value and has subjected him to pain. Bumbuku said if he were treated with respect and fed rice cakes he would, in return, perform acrobatic feats and dances. So the tinker built an outdoor theatre and advertised performances of "Bumbuku, The Magic Teakettle of Good Luck, and His Extraordinary Tricks". The most popular trick was when Bumbuku walked across a tight rope, carrying a parasol and a fan. The act became very popular and at the end of twenty days the tinker became rich. He was concerned about overworking Bumbuku and had enough money to be comfortable for the rest of his life. After talking with Bumbuku he took an offering and the kettle back to the priest. He told the priest what had happened and asked if Bumbuku could retire to the temple, be fed rice cakes and not be put over a fire. The priest agreed and put him in an honored place in the temple's treasure house, where he remains to this day.
1996.010.002 Ornament Badger Ornaments. A & B: Two ivory badger figures, two ivory disks attached to orange and green cord, fasted to green card C. C: Removable base of B, ( A's base is missing) is ivory and screws into base of B. Purple kanji printed on bottom. D & E: Metal Charms, representing Happy Gods, H: .25". F: Green Card with white printed badger and kanji: "Made in Yashima, Happy Goddess' spirit inside the ivory badger couple". Story of Bumbuku Chagama or The Magic Tea Kettle A priest at the Morinji Buddhist temple in Tatebayashi, Kotszke was very fond of the tea ceremony and he often looked for beautiful utensils. He polished an old tea kettle he had found at a second hand shop and put it aside. One day as he was admiring the beautifully shaped kettle he fell asleep. Suddenly the tea kettle sprouted a badger head, tail and legs and began to move around. The priest's pupils next door rushed in when they heard a noise and were astonished to see the badger/tea kettle, but when they woke the priest the kettle resumed its former shape. He did not believe what they told him and that evening he decided to make tea with the tea kettle. The kettle got hotter and hotter as the water heated over the brazier and the kettle quickly turned into a badger and jumped away. When they caught up with the kettle it once again resumed its ordinary shape. Thinking that the kettle must be bewitched, the priest decided to get rid of it. He offered to sell it to a tinker (a junkman who fixes items to resell) for a very cheap price. The tinker asked why he would want to sell such a nice kettle cheaply. The priest answered that he had other kettles. Taking the kettle home the tinker believed he had made an excellent deal. That night the tinker was woken by a voice calling him. He looked up to see a kettle with a badger head, tail and feet. The badger/kettle told him that he was not an ordinary kettle, but a badger who could transform himself into a kettle and his name was Bumbuku (Good Luck). He said he was willing to be of service to the man and that the priest had not understood his value and has subjected him to pain. Bumbuku said if he were treated with respect and fed rice cakes he would, in return, perform acrobatic feats and dances. So the tinker built an outdoor theatre and advertised performances of "Bumbuku, The Magic Teakettle of Good Luck, and His Extraordinary Tricks". The most popular trick was when Bumbuku walked across a tight rope, carrying a parasol and a fan. The act became very popular and at the end of twenty days the tinker became rich. He was concerned about overworking Bumbuku and had enough money to be comfortable for the rest of his life. After talking with Bumbuku he took an offering and the kettle back to the priest. He told the priest what had happened and asked if Bumbuku could retire to the temple, be fed rice cakes and not be put over a fire. The priest agreed and put him in an honored place in the temple's treasure house, where he remains to this day.
1996.010.003 Figurines Ceramic figurines Possible chopstick holders, small grey kettle, head and tail of brown and white badger. See 1996.10.10 Badger (Tanuki) Lore When the badger becomes 1000 years old, it can work magic, produce mirages, and change itself into all kinds of inanimate and human forms. It is connected with Buddhism when it takes the form of Buddha, a boddhisattva, priest, nun, pilgrim or a Buddhist speaking statue. Wicked priests turn back into badgers when they die. Considered to be very skillful with a brush, badgers often decorate writing implements. The badger leads people astray on moonlit nights by beating on its huge belly, as on a temple drum to make enticing rhythmic music and then disappears. The badger is more bent on mishchievious tricks than real evil. (Japanese Animal Art, Antique & Contemporary by Lea Batten, p. 46)
1996.010.004 Figurine Ceramic figurine Possible chopstick rest, White sitting bager with black eyes and blue vest. See 1996.10. 9 Badger (Tanuki) Lore When the badger becomes 1000 years old, it can work magic, produce mirages, and change itself into all kinds of inanimate and human forms. It is connected with Buddhism when it takes the form of Buddha, a boddhisattva, priest, nun, pilgrim or a Buddhist speaking statue. Wicked priests turn back into badgers when they die. Considered to be very skillful with a brush, badgers often decorate writing implements. The badger leads people astray on moonlit nights by beating on its huge belly, as on a temple drum to make enticing rhythmic music and then disappears. The badger is more bent on mishchievious tricks than real evil. (Japanese Animal Art, Antique & Contemporary by Lea Batten, p. 46)
1996.010.005 Bell Ceramic Bell Blue kettle shaped body with brown badger head, tail, handles. Bell shaped clapper suspended by thread, paper hanging from clapper with two kokeshi dolls and moon on one side kanji and grass script on other side: poem "Morning glories spread out covering the well and bucket, one must get water from elsewhere". Blue plastic tie threaded through holes in top. Story of Bumbuku Chagama or The Magic Tea Kettle A priest at the Morinji Buddhist temple in Tatebayashi, Kotszke was very fond of the tea ceremony and he often looked for beautiful utensils. He polished an old tea kettle he had found at a second hand shop and put it aside. One day as he was admiring the beautifully shaped kettle he fell asleep. Suddenly the tea kettle sprouted a badger head, tail and legs and began to move around. The priest's pupils next door rushed in when they heard a noise and were astonished to see the badger/tea kettle, but when they woke the priest the kettle resumed its former shape. He did not believe what they told him and that evening he decided to make tea with the tea kettle. The kettle got hotter and hotter as the water heated over the brazier and the kettle quickly turned into a badger and jumped away. When they caught up with the kettle it once again resumed its ordinary shape. Thinking that the kettle must be bewitched, the priest decided to get rid of it. He offered to sell it to a tinker (a junkman who fixes items to resell) for a very cheap price. The tinker asked why he would want to sell such a nice kettle cheaply. The priest answered that he had other kettles. Taking the kettle home the tinker believed he had made an excellent deal. That night the tinker was woken by a voice calling him. He looked up to see a kettle with a badger head, tail and feet. The badger/kettle told him that he was not an ordinary kettle, but a badger who could transform himself into a kettle and his name was Bumbuku (Good Luck). He said he was willing to be of service to the man and that the priest had not understood his value and has subjected him to pain. Bumbuku said if he were treated with respect and fed rice cakes he would, in return, perform acrobatic feats and dances. So the tinker built an outdoor theatre and advertised performances of "Bumbuku, The Magic Teakettle of Good Luck, and His Extraordinary Tricks". The most popular trick was when Bumbuku walked across a tight rope, carrying a parasol and a fan. The act became very popular and at the end of twenty days the tinker became rich. He was concerned about overworking Bumbuku and had enough money to be comfortable for the rest of his life. After talking with Bumbuku he took an offering and the kettle back to the priest. He told the priest what had happened and asked if Bumbuku could retire to the temple, be fed rice cakes and not be put over a fire. The priest agreed and put him in an honored place in the temple's treasure house, where he remains to this day.
1996.010.006 Figurine Painted Clay badger figurine Standing badger, with head turning to left, clay with black and white eyes, black body, brown tea kettle back, holding white, yellow and red fan. See 1996.10.12 Story of Bumbuku Chagama or The Magic Tea Kettle A priest at the Morinji Buddhist temple in Tatebayashi, Kotszke was very fond of the tea ceremony and he often looked for beautiful utensils. He polished an old tea kettle he had found at a second hand shop and put it aside. One day as he was admiring the beautifully shaped kettle he fell asleep. Suddenly the tea kettle sprouted a badger head, tail and legs and began to move around. The priest's pupils next door rushed in when they heard a noise and were astonished to see the badger/tea kettle, but when they woke the priest the kettle resumed its former shape. He did not believe what they told him and that evening he decided to make tea with the tea kettle. The kettle got hotter and hotter as the water heated over the brazier and the kettle quickly turned into a badger and jumped away. When they caught up with the kettle it once again resumed its ordinary shape. Thinking that the kettle must be bewitched, the priest decided to get rid of it. He offered to sell it to a tinker (a junkman who fixes items to resell) for a very cheap price. The tinker asked why he would want to sell such a nice kettle cheaply. The priest answered that he had other kettles. Taking the kettle home the tinker believed he had made an excellent deal. That night the tinker was woken by a voice calling him. He looked up to see a kettle with a badger head, tail and feet. The badger/kettle told him that he was not an ordinary kettle, but a badger who could transform himself into a kettle and his name was Bumbuku (Good Luck). He said he was willing to be of service to the man and that the priest had not understood his value and has subjected him to pain. Bumbuku said if he were treated with respect and fed rice cakes he would, in return, perform acrobatic feats and dances. So the tinker built an outdoor theatre and advertised performances of "Bumbuku, The Magic Teakettle of Good Luck, and His Extraordinary Tricks". The most popular trick was when Bumbuku walked across a tight rope, carrying a parasol and a fan. The act became very popular and at the end of twenty days the tinker became rich. He was concerned about overworking Bumbuku and had enough money to be comfortable for the rest of his life. After talking with Bumbuku he took an offering and the kettle back to the priest. He told the priest what had happened and asked if Bumbuku could retire to the temple, be fed rice cakes and not be put over a fire. The priest agreed and put him in an honored place in the temple's treasure house, where he remains to this day.
1996.010.007 Tea Kettle Ceramic badger/tea kettle ornament A: White tea kettle with brown badger head, feet and tail in the shape of a handle, mouth is the spout. B: Separate black lid with knob and steam hole. Tape residue on the side. See 1996.10.15. Story of Bumbuku Chagama or The Magic Tea Kettle A priest at the Morinji Buddhist temple in Tatebayashi, Kotszke was very fond of the tea ceremony and he often looked for beautiful utensils. He polished an old tea kettle he had found at a second hand shop and put it aside. One day as he was admiring the beautifully shaped kettle he fell asleep. Suddenly the tea kettle sprouted a badger head, tail and legs and began to move around. The priest's pupils next door rushed in when they heard a noise and were astonished to see the badger/tea kettle, but when they woke the priest the kettle resumed its former shape. He did not believe what they told him and that evening he decided to make tea with the tea kettle. The kettle got hotter and hotter as the water heated over the brazier and the kettle quickly turned into a badger and jumped away. When they caught up with the kettle it once again resumed its ordinary shape. Thinking that the kettle must be bewitched, the priest decided to get rid of it. He offered to sell it to a tinker (a junkman who fixes items to resell) for a very cheap price. The tinker asked why he would want to sell such a nice kettle cheaply. The priest answered that he had other kettles. Taking the kettle home the tinker believed he had made an excellent deal. That night the tinker was woken by a voice calling him. He looked up to see a kettle with a badger head, tail and feet. The badger/kettle told him that he was not an ordinary kettle, but a badger who could transform himself into a kettle and his name was Bumbuku (Good Luck). He said he was willing to be of service to the man and that the priest had not understood his value and has subjected him to pain. Bumbuku said if he were treated with respect and fed rice cakes he would, in return, perform acrobatic feats and dances. So the tinker built an outdoor theatre and advertised performances of "Bumbuku, The Magic Teakettle of Good Luck, and His Extraordinary Tricks". The most popular trick was when Bumbuku walked across a tight rope, carrying a parasol and a fan. The act became very popular and at the end of twenty days the tinker became rich. He was concerned about overworking Bumbuku and had enough money to be comfortable for the rest of his life. After talking with Bumbuku he took an offering and the kettle back to the priest. He told the priest what had happened and asked if Bumbuku could retire to the temple, be fed rice cakes and not be put over a fire. The priest agreed and put him in an honored place in the temple's treasure house, where he remains to this day.
1996.010.008 Jar Pottery jar with lid. A & B: Brown mottled glazed badger body, A, with head forming the lid, B. Badger (Tanuki) Lore When the badger becomes 1000 years old, it can work magic, produce mirages, and change itself into all kinds of inanimate and human forms. It is connected with Buddhism when it takes the form of Buddha, a boddhisattva, priest, nun, pilgrim or a Buddhist speaking statue. Wicked priests turn back into badgers when they die. Considered to be very skillful with a brush, badgers often decorate writing implements. The badger leads people astray on moonlit nights by beating on its huge belly, as on a temple drum to make enticing rhythmic music and then disappears. The badger is more bent on mishchievious tricks than real evil. (Japanese Animal Art, Antique & Contemporary by Lea Batten, p. 46)
1996.010.009 Figurine Ceramic figurine Possible chopstick rest, White sitting badger with black eyes and rust brown vest. See 1996.010. 004 Badger (Tanuki) Lore When the badger becomes 1000 years old, it can work magic, produce mirages, and change itself into all kinds of inanimate and human forms. It is connected with Buddhism when it takes the form of Buddha, a boddhisattva, priest, nun, pilgrim or a Buddhist speaking statue. Wicked priests turn back into badgers when they die. Considered to be very skillful with a brush, badgers often decorate writing implements. The badger leads people astray on moonlit nights by beating on its huge belly, as on a temple drum to make enticing rhythmic music and then disappears. The badger is more bent on mishchievious tricks than real evil. (Japanese Animal Art, Antique & Contemporary by Lea Batten, p. 46)
1996.010.010 Figurine Ceramic figurines Possible chopstick holders, small grey kettle, head and tail of brown and white badger. See 1996.010.003 Story of Bumbuku Chagama or The Magic Tea Kettle A priest at the Morinji Buddhist temple in Tatebayashi, Kotszke was very fond of the tea ceremony and he often looked for beautiful utensils. He polished an old tea kettle he had found at a second hand shop and put it aside. One day as he was admiring the beautifully shaped kettle he fell asleep. Suddenly the tea kettle sprouted a badger head, tail and legs and began to move around. The priest's pupils next door rushed in when they heard a noise and were astonished to see the badger/tea kettle, but when they woke the priest the kettle resumed its former shape. He did not believe what they told him and that evening he decided to make tea with the tea kettle. The kettle got hotter and hotter as the water heated over the brazier and the kettle quickly turned into a badger and jumped away. When they caught up with the kettle it once again resumed its ordinary shape. Thinking that the kettle must be bewitched, the priest decided to get rid of it. He offered to sell it to a tinker (a junkman who fixes items to resell) for a very cheap price. The tinker asked why he would want to sell such a nice kettle cheaply. The priest answered that he had other kettles. Taking the kettle home the tinker believed he had made an excellent deal. That night the tinker was woken by a voice calling him. He looked up to see a kettle with a badger head, tail and feet. The badger/kettle told him that he was not an ordinary kettle, but a badger who could transform himself into a kettle and his name was Bumbuku (Good Luck). He said he was willing to be of service to the man and that the priest had not understood his value and has subjected him to pain. Bumbuku said if he were treated with respect and fed rice cakes he would, in return, perform acrobatic feats and dances. So the tinker built an outdoor theatre and advertised performances of "Bumbuku, The Magic Teakettle of Good Luck, and His Extraordinary Tricks". The most popular trick was when Bumbuku walked across a tight rope, carrying a parasol and a fan. The act became very popular and at the end of twenty days the tinker became rich. He was concerned about overworking Bumbuku and had enough money to be comfortable for the rest of his life. After talking with Bumbuku he took an offering and the kettle back to the priest. He told the priest what had happened and asked if Bumbuku could retire to the temple, be fed rice cakes and not be put over a fire. The priest agreed and put him in an honored place in the temple's treasure house, where he remains to this day.
1996.010.011 Figurines 2 identical Ceramic Badger/Teakettle Figurines A: Brown badger, black teakettle with gold handles, #5 written on bottom B: Brown badger, black teakettle with gold handles Story of Bumbuku Chagama or The Magic Tea Kettle A priest at the Morinji Buddhist temple in Tatebayashi, Kotszke was very fond of the tea ceremony and he often looked for beautiful utensils. He polished an old tea kettle he had found at a second hand shop and put it aside. One day as he was admiring the beautifully shaped kettle he fell asleep. Suddenly the tea kettle sprouted a badger head, tail and legs and began to move around. The priest's pupils next door rushed in when they heard a noise and were astonished to see the badger/tea kettle, but when they woke the priest the kettle resumed its former shape. He did not believe what they told him and that evening he decided to make tea with the tea kettle. The kettle got hotter and hotter as the water heated over the brazier and the kettle quickly turned into a badger and jumped away. When they caught up with the kettle it once again resumed its ordinary shape. Thinking that the kettle must be bewitched, the priest decided to get rid of it. He offered to sell it to a tinker (a junkman who fixes items to resell) for a very cheap price. The tinker asked why he would want to sell such a nice kettle cheaply. The priest answered that he had other kettles. Taking the kettle home the tinker believed he had made an excellent deal. That night the tinker was woken by a voice calling him. He looked up to see a kettle with a badger head, tail and feet. The badger/kettle told him that he was not an ordinary kettle, but a badger who could transform himself into a kettle and his name was Bumbuku (Good Luck). He said he was willing to be of service to the man and that the priest had not understood his value and has subjected him to pain. Bumbuku said if he were treated with respect and fed rice cakes he would, in return, perform acrobatic feats and dances. So the tinker built an outdoor theatre and advertised performances of "Bumbuku, The Magic Teakettle of Good Luck, and His Extraordinary Tricks". The most popular trick was when Bumbuku walked across a tight rope, carrying a parasol and a fan. The act became very popular and at the end of twenty days the tinker became rich. He was concerned about overworking Bumbuku and had enough money to be comfortable for the rest of his life. After talking with Bumbuku he took an offering and the kettle back to the priest. He told the priest what had happened and asked if Bumbuku could retire to the temple, be fed rice cakes and not be put over a fire. The priest agreed and put him in an honored place in the temple's treasure house, where he remains to this day.
1996.010.012 Figurine Painted Clay badger figurine Standing badger, clay with black and white eyes, black body, brown tea kettle back, holding white, yellow and red fan. See 1996.10.6 Story of Bumbuku Chagama or The Magic Tea Kettle A priest at the Morinji Buddhist temple in Tatebayashi, Kotszke was very fond of the tea ceremony and he often looked for beautiful utensils. He polished an old tea kettle he had found at a second hand shop and put it aside. One day as he was admiring the beautifully shaped kettle he fell asleep. Suddenly the tea kettle sprouted a badger head, tail and legs and began to move around. The priest's pupils next door rushed in when they heard a noise and were astonished to see the badger/tea kettle, but when they woke the priest the kettle resumed its former shape. He did not believe what they told him and that evening he decided to make tea with the tea kettle. The kettle got hotter and hotter as the water heated over the brazier and the kettle quickly turned into a badger and jumped away. When they caught up with the kettle it once again resumed its ordinary shape. Thinking that the kettle must be bewitched, the priest decided to get rid of it. He offered to sell it to a tinker (a junkman who fixes items to resell) for a very cheap price. The tinker asked why he would want to sell such a nice kettle cheaply. The priest answered that he had other kettles. Taking the kettle home the tinker believed he had made an excellent deal. That night the tinker was woken by a voice calling him. He looked up to see a kettle with a badger head, tail and feet. The badger/kettle told him that he was not an ordinary kettle, but a badger who could transform himself into a kettle and his name was Bumbuku (Good Luck). He said he was willing to be of service to the man and that the priest had not understood his value and has subjected him to pain. Bumbuku said if he were treated with respect and fed rice cakes he would, in return, perform acrobatic feats and dances. So the tinker built an outdoor theatre and advertised performances of "Bumbuku, The Magic Teakettle of Good Luck, and His Extraordinary Tricks". The most popular trick was when Bumbuku walked across a tight rope, carrying a parasol and a fan. The act became very popular and at the end of twenty days the tinker became rich. He was concerned about overworking Bumbuku and had enough money to be comfortable for the rest of his life. After talking with Bumbuku he took an offering and the kettle back to the priest. He told the priest what had happened and asked if Bumbuku could retire to the temple, be fed rice cakes and not be put over a fire. The priest agreed and put him in an honored place in the temple's treasure house, where he remains to this day.
1996.010.013 Bell Painted pottery bell Standing badger figure, brown with white belly, holding orange lantern (kanji: "beware of fire"), wearing green lotus leaf hat. Rust brown string tied through hole in hat for suspension. Figure is hollow with ball inside. Slit in figure on bottom. Number 4 written on bottom. Badger (Tanuki) Lore "Tanuki Bozu" badger as a Buddhist priest, presumed to be kind and trustworthy, often shown coifed with a lotus leaf and wrapped in a lotus leaf cloak, the lotus being the chief emblem of Buddhism. When the badger becomes 1000 years old, it can work magic, produce mirages, and change itself into all kinds of inanimate and human forms. It is connected with Buddhism when it takes the form of Buddha, a bodhisattva, priest, nun, pilgrim or a Buddhist speaking statue. Wicked priests turn back into badgers when they die. Considered to be very skillful with a brush, badgers often decorate writing implements. The badger leads people astray on moonlit nights by beating on its huge belly, as on a temple drum to make enticing rhythmic music and then disappears. The badger is more bent on mischievous tricks than real evil. (Japanese Animal Art, Antique & Contemporary by Lea Batten, p. 46)
1996.010.014 Figurine Figure of Badger Painted brown standing badger wearing a yellow conical hat, black robe with white cross design, light blue pants, on left is a white satchel, on right he has a yellow walking stick, around neck is a yellow sign in kanji: "Two travelling together". #7 is written on the bottom. Badger (Tanuki) Lore When the badger becomes 1000 years old, it can work magic, produce mirages, and change itself into all kinds of inanimate and human forms. It is connected with Buddhism when it takes the form of Buddha, a boddhisattva, priest, nun, pilgrim or a Buddhist speaking statue. Wicked priests turn back into badgers when they die. "Tanuki Bozu" in the form of a Buddhist priest, presumed to be kind an trustworthy, shown coifed with a lotus leaf and wrapped in a lotus leaf cloak as an emblem of Buddhism. Considered to be very skillful with a brush, badgers often decorate writing implements. The badger leads people astray on moonlit nights by beating on its huge belly, as on a temple drum to make enticing rhythmic music and then disappears. The badger is more bent on mischievous tricks than real evil. (Japanese Animal Art, Antique & Contemporary by Lea Batten, p. 46)
1996.010.015 Tea Kettle Ceramic badger/tea kettle ornament A: White tea kettle with brown badger head, feet and tail in the shape of a handle, mouth is the spout. B: Separate black lid with knob and steam hole. See 1996.10.7. Story of Bumbuku Chagama or The Magic Tea Kettle A priest at the Morinji Buddhist temple in Tatebayashi, Kotszke was very fond of the tea ceremony and he often looked for beautiful utensils. He polished an old tea kettle he had found at a second hand shop and put it aside. One day as he was admiring the beautifully shaped kettle he fell asleep. Suddenly the tea kettle sprouted a badger head, tail and legs and began to move around. The priest's pupils next door rushed in when they heard a noise and were astonished to see the badger/tea kettle, but when they woke the priest the kettle resumed its former shape. He did not believe what they told him and that evening he decided to make tea with the tea kettle. The kettle got hotter and hotter as the water heated over the brazier and the kettle quickly turned into a badger and jumped away. When they caught up with the kettle it once again resumed its ordinary shape. Thinking that the kettle must be bewitched, the priest decided to get rid of it. He offered to sell it to a tinker (a junkman who fixes items to resell) for a very cheap price. The tinker asked why he would want to sell such a nice kettle cheaply. The priest answered that he had other kettles. Taking the kettle home the tinker believed he had made an excellent deal. That night the tinker was woken by a voice calling him. He looked up to see a kettle with a badger head, tail and feet. The badger/kettle told him that he was not an ordinary kettle, but a badger who could transform himself into a kettle and his name was Bumbuku (Good Luck). He said he was willing to be of service to the man and that the priest had not understood his value and has subjected him to pain. Bumbuku said if he were treated with respect and fed rice cakes he would, in return, perform acrobatic feats and dances. So the tinker built an outdoor theatre and advertised performances of "Bumbuku, The Magic Teakettle of Good Luck, and His Extraordinary Tricks". The most popular trick was when Bumbuku walked across a tight rope, carrying a parasol and a fan. The act became very popular and at the end of twenty days the tinker became rich. He was concerned about overworking Bumbuku and had enough money to be comfortable for the rest of his life. After talking with Bumbuku he took an offering and the kettle back to the priest. He told the priest what had happened and asked if Bumbuku could retire to the temple, be fed rice cakes and not be put over a fire. The priest agreed and put him in an honored place in the temple's treasure house, where he remains to this day.
1996.010.016 Figurine Ceramic figurine Standing badger blue and white with tea kettle on back, beige accents. Hole in head and small hole in end of tail. Possible water dropper for sumi ink stick. Story of Bumbuku Chagama or The Magic Tea Kettle A priest at the Morinji Buddhist temple in Tatebayashi, Kotszke was very fond of the tea ceremony and he often looked for beautiful utensils. He polished an old tea kettle he had found at a second hand shop and put it aside. One day as he was admiring the beautifully shaped kettle he fell asleep. Suddenly the tea kettle sprouted a badger head, tail and legs and began to move around. The priest's pupils next door rushed in when they heard a noise and were astonished to see the badger/tea kettle, but when they woke the priest the kettle resumed its former shape. He did not believe what they told him and that evening he decided to make tea with the tea kettle. The kettle got hotter and hotter as the water heated over the brazier and the kettle quickly turned into a badger and jumped away. When they caught up with the kettle it once again resumed its ordinary shape. Thinking that the kettle must be bewitched, the priest decided to get rid of it. He offered to sell it to a tinker (a junkman who fixes items to resell) for a very cheap price. The tinker asked why he would want to sell such a nice kettle cheaply. The priest answered that he had other kettles. Taking the kettle home the tinker believed he had made an excellent deal. That night the tinker was woken by a voice calling him. He looked up to see a kettle with a badger head, tail and feet. The badger/kettle told him that he was not an ordinary kettle, but a badger who could transform himself into a kettle and his name was Bumbuku (Good Luck). He said he was willing to be of service to the man and that the priest had not understood his value and has subjected him to pain. Bumbuku said if he were treated with respect and fed rice cakes he would, in return, perform acrobatic feats and dances. So the tinker built an outdoor theatre and advertised performances of "Bumbuku, The Magic Teakettle of Good Luck, and His Extraordinary Tricks". The most popular trick was when Bumbuku walked across a tight rope, carrying a parasol and a fan. The act became very popular and at the end of twenty days the tinker became rich. He was concerned about overworking Bumbuku and had enough money to be comfortable for the rest of his life. After talking with Bumbuku he took an offering and the kettle back to the priest. He told the priest what had happened and asked if Bumbuku could retire to the temple, be fed rice cakes and not be put over a fire. The priest agreed and put him in an honored place in the temple's treasure house, where he remains to this day.
1996.010.017 Figurine Painted clay figurine. One larger and one smaller badger, brown with white bellies, black circles around eyes, orange around mouths. Badger (Tanuki) Lore When the badger becomes 1000 years old, it can work magic, produce mirages, and change itself into all kinds of inanimate and human forms. It is connected with Buddhism when it takes the form of Buddha, a boddhisattva, priest, nun, pilgrim or a Buddhist speaking statue. Wicked priests turn back into badgers when they die. Considered to be very skillful with a brush, badgers often decorate writing implements. The badger leads people astray on moonlit nights by beating on its huge belly, as on a temple drum to make enticing rhythmic music and then disappears. The badger is more bent on mischievous tricks than real evil. (Japanese Animal Art, Antique & Contemporary by Lea Batten, p. 46)
1996.010.018 Figurine Painted clay badger figurine Brown with white belly, black and yellow eyes, paw with hole in bottom. Badger (Tanuki) Lore When the badger becomes 1000 years old, it can work magic, produce mirages, and change itself into all kinds of inanimate and human forms. It is connected with Buddhism when it takes the form of Buddha, a boddhisattva, priest, nun, pilgrim or a Buddhist speaking statue. Wicked priests turn back into badgers when they die. Considered to be very skillful with a brush, badgers often decorate writing implements. The badger leads people astray on moonlit nights by beating on its huge belly, as on a temple drum to make enticing rhythmic music and then disappears. The badger is more bent on mischievous tricks than real evil. (Japanese Animal Art, Antique & Contemporary by Lea Batten, p. 46)
1996.010.019 Figurine Clay badger figurine Painted figure standing on round black base, wears painted red kimono, which is spalling, bottom of figure is kanji script enclosed in circle: "Morinji" (temple where Bumbuku Chagama is famous) Badger (Tanuki) Lore "Tanuki Bozu" badger as a Buddhist priest, presumed to be kind and trustworthy, often shown coifed with a lotus leaf and wrapped in a lotus leaf cloak, the lotus being the chief emblem of Buddhism. When the badger becomes 1000 years old, it can work magic, produce mirages, and change itself into all kinds of inanimate and human forms. It is connected with Buddhism when it takes the form of Buddha, a boddhisattva, priest, nun, pilgrim or a Buddhist speaking statue. Wicked priests turn back into badgers when they die. Considered to be very skillful with a brush, badgers often decorate writing implements. The badger leads people astray on moonlit nights by beating on its huge belly, as on a temple drum to make enticing rhythmic music and then disappears. The badger is more bent on mischievous tricks than real evil. (Japanese Animal Art, Antique & Contemporary by Lea Batten, p. 46)
1996.010.020 Bell Ceramic Wind Bell Shaped as badger and tea kettle, light blue and white with brown badger head, tail and feet. Two holes in each side and on top. Yellow cord threaded through top holes and circular clay clangor with hole in middle, suspended inside bell by yellow cord. Paper suspended with red thread from clangor with painting of badger bell over another badger with kanji underneath. Kanji on reverse "Even in the night, the badger dances, the pot makes a noise"; "if you don't want to use as a wind chime put on the small plate and use it as an incense burner" Story of Bumbuku Chagama or The Magic Tea Kettle A priest at the Morinji Buddhist temple in Tatebayashi, Kotszke was very fond of the tea ceremony and he often looked for beautiful utensils. He polished an old tea kettle he had found at a second hand shop and put it aside. One day as he was admiring the beautifully shaped kettle he fell asleep. Suddenly the tea kettle sprouted a badger head, tail and legs and began to move around. The priest's pupils next door rushed in when they heard a noise and were astonished to see the badger/tea kettle, but when they woke the priest the kettle resumed its former shape. He did not believe what they told him and that evening he decided to make tea with the tea kettle. The kettle got hotter and hotter as the water heated over the brazier and the kettle quickly turned into a badger and jumped away. When they caught up with the kettle it once again resumed its ordinary shape. Thinking that the kettle must be bewitched, the priest decided to get rid of it. He offered to sell it to a tinker (a junkman who fixes items to resell) for a very cheap price. The tinker asked why he would want to sell such a nice kettle cheaply. The priest answered that he had other kettles. Taking the kettle home the tinker believed he had made an excellent deal. That night the tinker was woken by a voice calling him. He looked up to see a kettle with a badger head, tail and feet. The badger/kettle told him that he was not an ordinary kettle, but a badger who could transform himself into a kettle and his name was Bumbuku (Good Luck). He said he was willing to be of service to the man and that the priest had not understood his value and has subjected him to pain. Bumbuku said if he were treated with respect and fed rice cakes he would, in return, perform acrobatic feats and dances. So the tinker built an outdoor theatre and advertised performances of "Bumbuku, The Magic Teakettle of Good Luck, and His Extraordinary Tricks". The most popular trick was when Bumbuku walked across a tight rope, carrying a parasol and a fan. The act became very popular and at the end of twenty days the tinker became rich. He was concerned about overworking Bumbuku and had enough money to be comfortable for the rest of his life. After talking with Bumbuku he took an offering and the kettle back to the priest. He told the priest what had happened and asked if Bumbuku could retire to the temple, be fed rice cakes and not be put over a fire. The priest agreed and put him in an honored place in the temple's treasure house, where he remains to this day.
1996.010.021 Figurine Ceramic Badger/Teakettle Brown painted or stained clay with carved details: hair, claws, eyes, open mouth, mottled indentations in tea kettle top. Story of Bunbuku Chagama or The Magic Tea Kettle A priest at the Morinji Buddhist temple in Tatebayashi, Kotszke was very fond of the tea ceremony and he often looked for beautiful utensils. He polished an old tea kettle he had found at a second hand shop and put it aside. One day as he was admiring the beautifully shaped kettle he fell asleep. Suddenly the tea kettle sprouted a badger head, tail and legs and began to move around. The priest's pupils next door rushed in when they heard a noise and were astonished to see the badger/tea kettle, but when they woke the priest the kettle resumed its former shape. He did not believe what they told him and that evening he decided to make tea with the tea kettle. The kettle got hotter and hotter as the water heated over the brazier and the kettle quickly turned into a badger and jumped away. When they caught up with the kettle it once again resumed its ordinary shape. Thinking that the kettle must be bewitched, the priest decided to get rid of it. He offered to sell it to a tinker (a junkman who fixes items to resell) for a very cheap price. The tinker asked why he would want to sell such a nice kettle cheaply. The priest answered that he had other kettles. Taking the kettle home the tinker believed he had made an excellent deal. That night the tinker was woken by a voice calling him. He looked up to see a kettle with a badger head, tail and feet. The badger/kettle told him that he was not an ordinary kettle, but a badger who could transform himself into a kettle and his name was Bumbuku (Good Luck). He said he was willing to be of service to the man and that the priest had not understood his value and has subjected him to pain. Bumbuku said if he were treated with respect and fed rice cakes he would, in return, perform acrobatic feats and dances. So the tinker built an outdoor theatre and advertised performances of "Bumbuku, The Magic Teakettle of Good Luck, and His Extraordinary Tricks". The most popular trick was when Bumbuku walked across a tight rope, carrying a parasol and a fan. The act became very popular and at the end of twenty days the tinker became rich. He was concerned about overworking Bumbuku and had enough money to be comfortable for the rest of his life. After talking with Bumbuku he took an offering and the kettle back to the priest. He told the priest what had happened and asked if Bumbuku could retire to the temple, be fed rice cakes and not be put over a fire. The priest agreed and put him in an honored place in the temple's treasure house, where he remains to this day.
1996.010.022 Cup Ceramic Sake Cup Spout on outside of cup leads to double bottom, gold rimmed, picture of badger/tea kettle inside cup with kanji in gold and red: "Morinji" in red "Bumbuku" in gold Story of Bumbuku Chagama or The Magic Tea Kettle A priest at the Morinji Buddhist temple in Tatebayashi, Kotszke was very fond of the tea ceremony and he often looked for beautiful utensils. He polished an old tea kettle he had found at a second hand shop and put it aside. One day as he was admiring the beautifully shaped kettle he fell asleep. Suddenly the tea kettle sprouted a badger head, tail and legs and began to move around. The priest's pupils next door rushed in when they heard a noise and were astonished to see the badger/tea kettle, but when they woke the priest the kettle resumed its former shape. He did not believe what they told him and that evening he decided to make tea with the tea kettle. The kettle got hotter and hotter as the water heated over the brazier and the kettle quickly turned into a badger and jumped away. When they caught up with the kettle it once again resumed its ordinary shape. Thinking that the kettle must be bewitched, the priest decided to get rid of it. He offered to sell it to a tinker (a junkman who fixes items to resell) for a very cheap price. The tinker asked why he would want to sell such a nice kettle cheaply. The priest answered that he had other kettles. Taking the kettle home the tinker believed he had made an excellent deal. That night the tinker was woken by a voice calling him. He looked up to see a kettle with a badger head, tail and feet. The badger/kettle told him that he was not an ordinary kettle, but a badger who could transform himself into a kettle and his name was Bumbuku (Good Luck). He said he was willing to be of service to the man and that the priest had not understood his value and has subjected him to pain. Bumbuku said if he were treated with respect and fed rice cakes he would, in return, perform acrobatic feats and dances. So the tinker built an outdoor theatre and advertised performances of "Bumbuku, The Magic Teakettle of Good Luck, and His Extraordinary Tricks". The most popular trick was when Bumbuku walked across a tight rope, carrying a parasol and a fan. The act became very popular and at the end of twenty days the tinker became rich. He was concerned about overworking Bumbuku and had enough money to be comfortable for the rest of his life. After talking with Bumbuku he took an offering and the kettle back to the priest. He told the priest what had happened and asked if Bumbuku could retire to the temple, be fed rice cakes and not be put over a fire. The priest agreed and put him in an honored place in the temple's treasure house, where he remains to this day.
1996.010.023 Container Plastic Container with lid Possibly for food service. A: Bottom is round black bowl with gold badger feet and tail, kanji imprinted on bottom. B: Lid is brown plastic with gold badger face and tail and tea kettle handles. Two badger shaped labels with kanji inside. Story of Bumbuku Chagama or The Magic Tea Kettle A priest at the Morinji Buddhist temple in Tatebayashi, Kotszke was very fond of the tea ceremony and he often looked for beautiful utensils. He polished an old tea kettle he had found at a second hand shop and put it aside. One day as he was admiring the beautifully shaped kettle he fell asleep. Suddenly the tea kettle sprouted a badger head, tail and legs and began to move around. The priest's pupils next door rushed in when they heard a noise and were astonished to see the badger/tea kettle, but when they woke the priest the kettle resumed its former shape. He did not believe what they told him and that evening he decided to make tea with the tea kettle. The kettle got hotter and hotter as the water heated over the brazier and the kettle quickly turned into a badger and jumped away. When they caught up with the kettle it once again resumed its ordinary shape. Thinking that the kettle must be bewitched, the priest decided to get rid of it. He offered to sell it to a tinker (a junkman who fixes items to resell) for a very cheap price. The tinker asked why he would want to sell such a nice kettle cheaply. The priest answered that he had other kettles. Taking the kettle home the tinker believed he had made an excellent deal. That night the tinker was woken by a voice calling him. He looked up to see a kettle with a badger head, tail and feet. The badger/kettle told him that he was not an ordinary kettle, but a badger who could transform himself into a kettle and his name was Bumbuku (Good Luck). He said he was willing to be of service to the man and that the priest had not understood his value and has subjected him to pain. Bumbuku said if he were treated with respect and fed rice cakes he would, in return, perform acrobatic feats and dances. So the tinker built an outdoor theatre and advertised performances of "Bumbuku, The Magic Teakettle of Good Luck, and His Extraordinary Tricks". The most popular trick was when Bumbuku walked across a tight rope, carrying a parasol and a fan. The act became very popular and at the end of twenty days the tinker became rich. He was concerned about overworking Bumbuku and had enough money to be comfortable for the rest of his life. After talking with Bumbuku he took an offering and the kettle back to the priest. He told the priest what had happened and asked if Bumbuku could retire to the temple, be fed rice cakes and not be put over a fire. The priest agreed and put him in an honored place in the temple's treasure house, where he remains to this day.
1996.010.024 Ornament Painted wood badger ornament. Two badger figures with kokeshi style bobbing heads stand on green platform, with black and white screen behind. Smaller badger on left has white kimono and black hakama, brown head with black and white features, larger figure on right wears orange kimono with yellow floral design and green obi. She holds batton with white end in front stands round red object. Badger (Tanuki) Lore When the badger becomes 1000 years old, it can work magic, produce mirages, and change itself into all kinds of inanimate and human forms. It is connected with Buddhism when it takes the form of Buddha, a boddhisattva, priest, nun, pilgrim or a Buddhist speaking statue. Wicked priests turn back into badgers when they die. Considered to be very skillful with a brush, badgers often decorate writing implements. The badger leads people astray on moonlit nights by beating on its huge belly, as on a temple drum to make enticing rhythmic music and then disappears. The badger is more bent on mishchievious tricks than real evil. (Japanese Animal Art, Antique & Contemporary by Lea Batten, p. 46)
1996.010.025 Ornament Wood Ornament Painted and varnished carved wood. On left is standing badger figure with black, gold, red and white features, a water dipper lays in front, On right is wood tea kettle with badger head, has red , white , black and gold features and metal handles. Platform has kanji on front: "Morinji" . Story of Bumbuku Chagama or The Magic Tea Kettle A priest at the Morinji Buddhist temple in Tatebayashi, Kotszke was very fond of the tea ceremony and he often looked for beautiful utensils. He polished an old tea kettle he had found at a second hand shop and put it aside. One day as he was admiring the beautifully shaped kettle he fell asleep. Suddenly the tea kettle sprouted a badger head, tail and legs and began to move around. The priest's pupils next door rushed in when they heard a noise and were astonished to see the badger/tea kettle, but when they woke the priest the kettle resumed its former shape. He did not believe what they told him and that evening he decided to make tea with the tea kettle. The kettle got hotter and hotter as the water heated over the brazier and the kettle quickly turned into a badger and jumped away. When they caught up with the kettle it once again resumed its ordinary shape. Thinking that the kettle must be bewitched, the priest decided to get rid of it. He offered to sell it to a tinker (a junkman who fixes items to resell) for a very cheap price. The tinker asked why he would want to sell such a nice kettle cheaply. The priest answered that he had other kettles. Taking the kettle home the tinker believed he had made an excellent deal. That night the tinker was woken by a voice calling him. He looked up to see a kettle with a badger head, tail and feet. The badger/kettle told him that he was not an ordinary kettle, but a badger who could transform himself into a kettle and his name was Bumbuku (Good Luck). He said he was willing to be of service to the man and that the priest had not understood his value and has subjected him to pain. Bumbuku said if he were treated with respect and fed rice cakes he would, in return, perform acrobatic feats and dances. So the tinker built an outdoor theatre and advertised performances of "Bumbuku, The Magic Teakettle of Good Luck, and His Extraordinary Tricks". The most popular trick was when Bumbuku walked across a tight rope, carrying a parasol and a fan. The act became very popular and at the end of twenty days the tinker became rich. He was concerned about overworking Bumbuku and had enough money to be comfortable for the rest of his life. After talking with Bumbuku he took an offering and the kettle back to the priest. He told the priest what had happened and asked if Bumbuku could retire to the temple, be fed rice cakes and not be put over a fire. The priest agreed and put him in an honored place in the temple's treasure house, where he remains to this day.
1996.010.026 Ornament Wood sculpture ornament A: Badger carved from wood has glass eyes and some white paint on each side. B: separate wooden hat with straw cord. Wood has highly defined tree rings. Badger (Tanuki) Lore When the badger becomes 1000 years old, it can work magic, produce mirages, and change itself into all kinds of inanimate and human forms. It is connected with Buddhism when it takes the form of Buddha, a boddhisattva, priest, nun, pilgrim or a Buddhist speaking statue. Wicked priests turn back into badgers when they die. "Tanuki Bozu" in the form of a Buddhist priest, presumed to be kind an trustworthy, shown coiffed with a lotus leaf and wrapped in a lotus leaf cloak as an emblem of Buddhism. Considered to be very skillful with a brush, badgers often decorate writing implements. The badger leads people astray on moonlit nights by beating on its huge belly, as on a temple drum to make enticing rhythmic music and then disappears. The badger is more bent on mishchievious tricks than real evil. (Japanese Animal Art, Antique & Contemporary by Lea Batten, p. 46)
1996.010.027 Ornament Painted and varnished wooden badgers Badger at left poking head from water dipper, badger at right is a part of a tea kettle with metal handles. Both have black white and red features, They are mounted in a platform which has kanji on front (2nd character has faded). Story of Bumbuku Chagama or The Magic Tea Kettle A priest at the Morinji Buddhist temple in Tatebayashi, Kotszke was very fond of the tea ceremony and he often looked for beautiful utensils. He polished an old tea kettle he had found at a second hand shop and put it aside. One day as he was admiring the beautifully shaped kettle he fell asleep. Suddenly the tea kettle sprouted a badger head, tail and legs and began to move around. The priest's pupils next door rushed in when they heard a noise and were astonished to see the badger/tea kettle, but when they woke the priest the kettle resumed its former shape. He did not believe what they told him and that evening he decided to make tea with the tea kettle. The kettle got hotter and hotter as the water heated over the brazier and the kettle quickly turned into a badger and jumped away. When they caught up with the kettle it once again resumed its ordinary shape. Thinking that the kettle must be bewitched, the priest decided to get rid of it. He offered to sell it to a tinker (a junkman who fixes items to resell) for a very cheap price. The tinker asked why he would want to sell such a nice kettle cheaply. The priest answered that he had other kettles. Taking the kettle home the tinker believed he had made an excellent deal. That night the tinker was woken by a voice calling him. He looked up to see a kettle with a badger head, tail and feet. The badger/kettle told him that he was not an ordinary kettle, but a badger who could transform himself into a kettle and his name was Bumbuku (Good Luck). He said he was willing to be of service to the man and that the priest had not understood his value and has subjected him to pain. Bumbuku said if he were treated with respect and fed rice cakes he would, in return, perform acrobatic feats and dances. So the tinker built an outdoor theatre and advertised performances of "Bumbuku, The Magic Teakettle of Good Luck, and His Extraordinary Tricks". The most popular trick was when Bumbuku walked across a tight rope, carrying a parasol and a fan. The act became very popular and at the end of twenty days the tinker became rich. He was concerned about overworking Bumbuku and had enough money to be comfortable for the rest of his life. After talking with Bumbuku he took an offering and the kettle back to the priest. He told the priest what had happened and asked if Bumbuku could retire to the temple, be fed rice cakes and not be put over a fire. The priest agreed and put him in an honored place in the temple's treasure house, where he remains to this day.
1996.010.028 Ornament Wood Badger Ornament Carved wood ornament with glued parts. Bottom of the ornament is a rice kettle with badger head, tail and feet. Face has red ears, black, white and yellow features. The kettle has a metal handle and a braid red and white bow with red and white tassels. The kettle has a round wood lid with 2 crossbars. Through one of the wood lid handles is a water dipper, on top of the lid is smaller wood rice kettle with its own lid and metal handle. This kettle has another badger head, and tail. The face has red and black features with red ears. Well defined wood grain on both kettles. On the bottom of the ornament is stamped " Made in Japan". Story of Bumbuku Chagama or The Magic Tea Kettle A priest at the Morinji Buddhist temple in Tatebayashi, Kotszke was very fond of the tea ceremony and he often looked for beautiful utensils. He polished an old tea kettle he had found at a second hand shop and put it aside. One day as he was admiring the beautifully shaped kettle he fell asleep. Suddenly the tea kettle sprouted a badger head, tail and legs and began to move around. The priest's pupils next door rushed in when they heard a noise and were astonished to see the badger/tea kettle, but when they woke the priest the kettle resumed its former shape. He did not believe what they told him and that evening he decided to make tea with the tea kettle. The kettle got hotter and hotter as the water heated over the brazier and the kettle quickly turned into a badger and jumped away. When they caught up with the kettle it once again resumed its ordinary shape. Thinking that the kettle must be bewitched, the priest decided to get rid of it. He offered to sell it to a tinker (a junkman who fixes items to resell) for a very cheap price. The tinker asked why he would want to sell such a nice kettle cheaply. The priest answered that he had other kettles. Taking the kettle home the tinker believed he had made an excellent deal. That night the tinker was woken by a voice calling him. He looked up to see a kettle with a badger head, tail and feet. The badger/kettle told him that he was not an ordinary kettle, but a badger who could transform himself into a kettle and his name was Bumbuku (Good Luck). He said he was willing to be of service to the man and that the priest had not understood his value and has subjected him to pain. Bumbuku said if he were treated with respect and fed rice cakes he would, in return, perform acrobatic feats and dances. So the tinker built an outdoor theatre and advertised performances of "Bumbuku, The Magic Teakettle of Good Luck, and His Extraordinary Tricks". The most popular trick was when Bumbuku walked across a tight rope, carrying a parasol and a fan. The act became very popular and at the end of twenty days the tinker became rich. He was concerned about overworking Bumbuku and had enough money to be comfortable for the rest of his life. After talking with Bumbuku he took an offering and the kettle back to the priest. He told the priest what had happened and asked if Bumbuku could retire to the temple, be fed rice cakes and not be put over a fire. The priest agreed and put him in an honored place in the temple's treasure house, where he remains to this day.
1996.010.029 Figurine
1996.010.030 Figurine Carved wood badger figure. Badger has bobbing head, red ears, brown white and red painted features. Round body has hole in front with bobbing badger head sticking out., with one ear missing. Also attached to body is a tail, a sake bottle with purple cord, a miniature booklet nailed to the side with kanji on front: "Big fortune notebook", and two feet nailed to the bottom. On his head is palm hat with blue patch at crown and purple cord around chin. Badger (Tanuki) Lore When the badger becomes 1000 years old, it can work magic, produce mirages, and change itself into all kinds of inanimate and human forms. It is connected with Buddhism when it takes the form of Buddha, a boddhisattva, priest, nun, pilgrim or a Buddhist speaking statue. Wicked priests turn back into badgers when they die. "Tanuki Bozu" in the form of a Buddhist priest, presumed to be kind an trustworthy, shown coiffed with a lotus leaf and wrapped in a lotus leaf cloak as an emblem of Buddhism. Considered to be very skillful with a brush, badgers often decorate writing implements. The badger leads people astray on moonlit nights by beating on its huge belly, as on a temple drum to make enticing rhythmic music and then disappears. The badger is more bent on mishchievious tricks than real evil. (Japanese Animal Art, Antique & Contemporary by Lea Batten, p. 46)
1996.010.031 Die Holders Pair of plastic die holders--Fortune telling dolls Die holders are daruma shaped. They are weighted with green substance. Upper section is painted purple with rust, black and white badger face, paws and tail. Above the badgers head are two rust colored handles and a top denoting a tea kettle. Bottom sections are clear and inside are dice. Both pieces are similar. Stored in small cardboard boxes which contain explanation in Japanese: shows according to the number you get the possibility of marriage (1 means you will get a marriage proposal, 2 its better to let it drag on, 3 better to refuse, 4 your prospective mate will change and it will go well, 5 successful marriage, 6 difficult but go with your passion), love life (1 successful if you are bold, 2 progress with caution, 3 something bad happens once but then ok, 4 go back to where you started but if you do your best it will come out, 5 success, 6 go with love and passion), money (1 bad, 2 half way through negotiating a loan it will be successful, 3 better to delay, 4 change to another negotiater, 5 and 6 ok), travelling (1 good, 2 good if nearby, 3 further away the better, 4 wait for 2 or 3 days, 5 ok if you have a travelling companion, 6 ok), something you lost (1, 2 won't find it, 3 when you forget out it you will find it, 4 & 5 you won't find it, 6 will find it definitely) , business (1 lots of hardship, 2 better to change your occupation, 3 do your best for awhile, 4 continue doing what you are doing, 5 even though difficult go ahead, 6 continue as you are doing, court case (1 you lose, 2 you lose but appeal, 3 victory, 4 ends in a tie, 5 easy big win, 6 difficult hardship win) Story of Bumbuku Chagama or The Magic Tea Kettle A priest at the Morinji Buddhist temple in Tatebayashi, Kotszke was very fond of the tea ceremony and he often looked for beautiful utensils. He polished an old tea kettle he had found at a second hand shop and put it aside. One day as he was admiring the beautifully shaped kettle he fell asleep. Suddenly the tea kettle sprouted a badger head, tail and legs and began to move around. The priest's pupils next door rushed in when they heard a noise and were astonished to see the badger/tea kettle, but when they woke the priest the kettle resumed its former shape. He did not believe what they told him and that evening he decided to make tea with the tea kettle. The kettle got hotter and hotter as the water heated over the brazier and the kettle quickly turned into a badger and jumped away. When they caught up with the kettle it once again resumed its ordinary shape. Thinking that the kettle must be bewitched, the priest decided to get rid of it. He offered to sell it to a tinker (a junkman who fixes items to resell) for a very cheap price. The tinker asked why he would want to sell such a nice kettle cheaply. The priest answered that he had other kettles. Taking the kettle home the tinker believed he had made an excellent deal. That night the tinker was woken by a voice calling him. He looked up to see a kettle with a badger head, tail and feet. The badger/kettle told him that he was not an ordinary kettle, but a badger who could transform himself into a kettle and his name was Bumbuku (Good Luck). He said he was willing to be of service to the man and that the priest had not understood his value and has subjected him to pain. Bumbuku said if he were treated with respect and fed rice cakes he would, in return, perform acrobatic feats and dances. So the tinker built an outdoor theatre and advertised performances of "Bumbuku, The Magic Teakettle of Good Luck, and His Extraordinary Tricks". The most popular trick was when Bumbuku walked across a tight rope, carrying a parasol and a fan. The act became very popular and at the end of twenty days the tinker became rich. He was concerned about overworking Bumbuku and had enough money to be comfortable for the rest of his life. After talking with Bumbuku he took an offering and the kettle back to the priest. He told the priest what had happened and asked if Bumbuku could retire to the temple, be fed rice cakes and not be put over a fire. The priest agreed and put him in an honored place in the temple's treasure house, where he remains to this day.
1996.010.032 Plaque Wood Plaques A: Placque painted on the front is a picture of the badger on a tight rope with a yellow umbrella. On his back is a black tea kettle with white kanji. Above left are black kanji characters: "Avoid misfortune (especially traffic accidents)". Below right is a red seal. The plaque is wider at the bottom than the top, and the top is pointed. A yellow braided cord is tied through hole in top. On the back is Stamped two circles with kanji in red. B: Badger Plaque, H: 2.875", W: 5.375", D: .25", wooden rectangular plaque with peak in center painted red trim resembling a roof, On the front is a hand painted badger in black with white eyes, nose and ears. In the lower right hand corner are two Japanese characters "Usagi Tsuki" (Artist's name meaning rabbit in the moon), in black ink and one in red ink. On the back is a pyro engraved design of tea kettle and kanji "Bumbuku Morinji Miyage" (temple souvenir). Above this written in ink, "17. Ema". Story of Bumbuku Chagama or The Magic Tea Kettle A priest at the Morinji Buddhist temple in Tatebayashi, Kotszke was very fond of the tea ceremony and he often looked for beautiful utensils. He polished an old tea kettle he had found at a second hand shop and put it aside. One day as he was admiring the beautifully shaped kettle he fell asleep. Suddenly the tea kettle sprouted a badger head, tail and legs and began to move around. The priest's pupils next door rushed in when they heard a noise and were astonished to see the badger/tea kettle, but when they woke the priest the kettle resumed its former shape. He did not believe what they told him and that evening he decided to make tea with the tea kettle. The kettle got hotter and hotter as the water heated over the brazier and the kettle quickly turned into a badger and jumped away. When they caught up with the kettle it once again resumed its ordinary shape. Thinking that the kettle must be bewitched, the priest decided to get rid of it. He offered to sell it to a tinker (a junkman who fixes items to resell) for a very cheap price. The tinker asked why he would want to sell such a nice kettle cheaply. The priest answered that he had other kettles. Taking the kettle home the tinker believed he had made an excellent deal. That night the tinker was woken by a voice calling him. He looked up to see a kettle with a badger head, tail and feet. The badger/kettle told him that he was not an ordinary kettle, but a badger who could transform himself into a kettle and his name was Bumbuku (Good Luck). He said he was willing to be of service to the man and that the priest had not understood his value and has subjected him to pain. Bumbuku said if he were treated with respect and fed rice cakes he would, in return, perform acrobatic feats and dances. So the tinker built an outdoor theatre and advertised performances of "Bumbuku, The Magic Teakettle of Good Luck, and His Extraordinary Tricks". The most popular trick was when Bumbuku walked across a tight rope, carrying a parasol and a fan. The act became very popular and at the end of twenty days the tinker became rich. He was concerned about overworking Bumbuku and had enough money to be comfortable for the rest of his life. After talking with Bumbuku he took an offering and the kettle back to the priest. He told the priest what had happened and asked if Bumbuku could retire to the temple, be fed rice cakes and not be put over a fire. The priest agreed and put him in an honored place in the temple's treasure house, where he remains to this day.
1996.010.034 Scroll Bumbuku Chagama Scroll Scroll made of coarsely woven silk applied to paper, yellowish white, in center is a water color and ink painting of a Buddhist acolyte in a blue robe, black apron, white obi, white tabi and white headband chasing Bumbuku Chagama, the badger/teakettle with a broom. The painting is surrounded by a green and beige floral patterned brocade; upper part of scroll is adhered to half round wood dowel at top (split along edge), white and black braid attached for hanging at top, and bottom wraps around black dowling. A red shield shape at the bottom right appears to have the initials A R stamped on it. On the back in pencil is written "Kakenoma (wall-hanging scroll) Bunbuku Chagam from Morinji Temple". Signs of mildew spotting. Story of Bumbuku Chagama or The Magic Tea Kettle A priest at the Morinji Buddhist temple in Tatebayashi, Kotszke was very fond of the tea ceremony and he often looked for beautiful utensils. He polished an old tea kettle he had found at a second hand shop and put it aside. One day as he was admiring the beautifully shaped kettle he fell asleep. Suddenly the tea kettle sprouted a badger head, tail and legs and began to move around. The priest's pupils next door rushed in when they heard a noise and were astonished to see the badger/tea kettle, but when they woke the priest the kettle resumed its former shape. He did not believe what they told him and that evening he decided to make tea with the tea kettle. The kettle got hotter and hotter as the water heated over the brazier and the kettle quickly turned into a badger and jumped away. When they caught up with the kettle it once again resumed its ordinary shape. Thinking that the kettle must be bewitched, the priest decided to get rid of it. He offered to sell it to a tinker (a junkman who fixes items to resell) for a very cheap price. The tinker asked why he would want to sell such a nice kettle cheaply. The priest answered that he had other kettles. Taking the kettle home the tinker believed he had made an excellent deal. That night the tinker was woken by a voice calling him. He looked up to see a kettle with a badger head, tail and feet. The badger/kettle told him that he was not an ordinary kettle, but a badger who could transform himself into a kettle and his name was Bumbuku (Good Luck). He said he was willing to be of service to the man and that the priest had not understood his value and has subjected him to pain. Bumbuku said if he were treated with respect and fed rice cakes he would, in return, perform acrobatic feats and dances. So the tinker built an outdoor theatre and advertised performances of "Bumbuku, The Magic Teakettle of Good Luck, and His Extraordinary Tricks". The most popular trick was when Bumbuku walked across a tight rope, carrying a parasol and a fan. The act became very popular and at the end of twenty days the tinker became rich. He was concerned about overworking Bumbuku and had enough money to be comfortable for the rest of his life. After talking with Bumbuku he took an offering and the kettle back to the priest. He told the priest what had happened and asked if Bumbuku could retire to the temple, be fed rice cakes and not be put over a fire. The priest agreed and put him in an honored place in the temple's treasure house, where he remains to this day.
1996.010.035 Scroll Bumbuku Chagama Scroll Sumi ink painting with green cloud design paper background. The painting is of a badger peeking out of a tea kettle with a lid, only his eyes and one ear show. Above this is a kanji inscription in black grass script, (Under the hazey moon a tea kettle starts dancing) with a red seal on the upper right, just below is another inscription with a shaped seal. At the bottom is another inscription with a red seal. At the top and bottom of the painting is a strip of grey paper printed with a gold floral design. The scroll is glued to a half round dowel at the top with a black and white braid with metal fasteners for hanging and it is glued to a dark brown dowel at the bottom. Story of Bumbuku Chagama or The Magic Tea Kettle A priest at the Morinji Buddhist temple in Tatebayashi, Kotszke was very fond of the tea ceremony and he often looked for beautiful utensils. He polished an old tea kettle he had found at a second hand shop and put it aside. One day as he was admiring the beautifully shaped kettle he fell asleep. Suddenly the tea kettle sprouted a badger head, tail and legs and began to move around. The priest's pupils next door rushed in when they heard a noise and were astonished to see the badger/tea kettle, but when they woke the priest the kettle resumed its former shape. He did not believe what they told him and that evening he decided to make tea with the tea kettle. The kettle got hotter and hotter as the water heated over the brazier and the kettle quickly turned into a badger and jumped away. When they caught up with the kettle it once again resumed its ordinary shape. Thinking that the kettle must be bewitched, the priest decided to get rid of it. He offered to sell it to a tinker (a junkman who fixes items to resell) for a very cheap price. The tinker asked why he would want to sell such a nice kettle cheaply. The priest answered that he had other kettles. Taking the kettle home the tinker believed he had made an excellent deal. That night the tinker was woken by a voice calling him. He looked up to see a kettle with a badger head, tail and feet. The badger/kettle told him that he was not an ordinary kettle, but a badger who could transform himself into a kettle and his name was Bumbuku (Good Luck). He said he was willing to be of service to the man and that the priest had not understood his value and has subjected him to pain. Bumbuku said if he were treated with respect and fed rice cakes he would, in return, perform acrobatic feats and dances. So the tinker built an outdoor theatre and advertised performances of "Bumbuku, The Magic Teakettle of Good Luck, and His Extraordinary Tricks". The most popular trick was when Bumbuku walked across a tight rope, carrying a parasol and a fan. The act became very popular and at the end of twenty days the tinker became rich. He was concerned about overworking Bumbuku and had enough money to be comfortable for the rest of his life. After talking with Bumbuku he took an offering and the kettle back to the priest. He told the priest what had happened and asked if Bumbuku could retire to the temple, be fed rice cakes and not be put over a fire. The priest agreed and put him in an honored place in the temple's treasure house, where he remains to this day.
1996.010.036 Fan Uchiwa style flat fan. Sumi ink painting on one side show Buddhist monk kneeling and bowing in front of tea kettle, figure faces toward viewer; at upper left is a small red seal. On the reverse is a black inscription "To my teacher, Georgia Sealoff" in Japanese with the date 1954, 8.14. The fan is made of white paper adhered to thin bamboo spokes radiating from a lower central silk cloth sandwiched between a slot in the carved bamboo handle, which has speckled bark on the painting side. Possibly donor received this fan at the Morinji temple on August 14, 1954. Story of Bumbuku Chagama or The Magic Tea Kettle A priest at the Morinji Buddhist temple in Tatebayashi, Kotszke was very fond of the tea ceremony and he often looked for beautiful utensils. He polished an old tea kettle he had found at a second hand shop and put it aside. One day as he was admiring the beautifully shaped kettle he fell asleep. Suddenly the tea kettle sprouted a badger head, tail and legs and began to move around. The priest's pupils next door rushed in when they heard a noise and were astonished to see the badger/tea kettle, but when they woke the priest the kettle resumed its former shape. He did not believe what they told him and that evening he decided to make tea with the tea kettle. The kettle got hotter and hotter as the water heated over the brazier and the kettle quickly turned into a badger and jumped away. When they caught up with the kettle it once again resumed its ordinary shape. Thinking that the kettle must be bewitched, the priest decided to get rid of it. He offered to sell it to a tinker (a junkman who fixes items to resell) for a very cheap price. The tinker asked why he would want to sell such a nice kettle cheaply. The priest answered that he had other kettles. Taking the kettle home the tinker believed he had made an excellent deal. That night the tinker was woken by a voice calling him. He looked up to see a kettle with a badger head, tail and feet. The badger/kettle told him that he was not an ordinary kettle, but a badger who could transform himself into a kettle and his name was Bumbuku (Good Luck). He said he was willing to be of service to the man and that the priest had not understood his value and has subjected him to pain. Bumbuku said if he were treated with respect and fed rice cakes he would, in return, perform acrobatic feats and dances. So the tinker built an outdoor theatre and advertised performances of "Bumbuku, The Magic Teakettle of Good Luck, and His Extraordinary Tricks". The most popular trick was when Bumbuku walked across a tight rope, carrying a parasol and a fan. The act became very popular and at the end of twenty days the tinker became rich. He was concerned about overworking Bumbuku and had enough money to be comfortable for the rest of his life. After talking with Bumbuku he took an offering and the kettle back to the priest. He told the priest what had happened and asked if Bumbuku could retire to the temple, be fed rice cakes and not be put over a fire. The priest agreed and put him in an honored place in the temple's treasure house, where he remains to this day.
1996.010.037 Fans 2 identical Uchiwa style flat Fans a,b: On the front of the fan is printed a brown badger in a black tea kettle walking a black tightrope with a white fan with a red dot in his left paw and a red umbrella in his right. Below are scattered red flowers and green leaves; above is a green mountain shape in the background and black kanji written over it "Tatebayashi". The back has black Japanese printing: Village song: (first verse) "During azalea blossom time", "In the Spring azalea blooms from here to the hill, even mist is clear, give motif for white and red, only thing that blooms is azalea or a parasol, Even the flying butterfly is in twosome, Let's dance and work and build a country". The fan is a rounded square shape at the top, wider than the bottom; yellowed white paper is adhered to both side of thin bamboo spokes radiating from a shaped bamboo handle and u-shaped bottom frame. On the paper at the base of the fan are characters printed in black. Written in blue ink on the back of the handle is "No. 15". Story of Bumbuku Chagama or The Magic Tea Kettle A priest at the Morinji Buddhist temple in Tatebayashi, Kotszke was very fond of the tea ceremony and he often looked for beautiful utensils. He polished an old tea kettle he had found at a second hand shop and put it aside. One day as he was admiring the beautifully shaped kettle he fell asleep. Suddenly the tea kettle sprouted a badger head, tail and legs and began to move around. The priest's pupils next door rushed in when they heard a noise and were astonished to see the badger/tea kettle, but when they woke the priest the kettle resumed its former shape. He did not believe what they told him and that evening he decided to make tea with the tea kettle. The kettle got hotter and hotter as the water heated over the brazier and the kettle quickly turned into a badger and jumped away. When they caught up with the kettle it once again resumed its ordinary shape. Thinking that the kettle must be bewitched, the priest decided to get rid of it. He offered to sell it to a tinker (a junkman who fixes items to resell) for a very cheap price. The tinker asked why he would want to sell such a nice kettle cheaply. The priest answered that he had other kettles. Taking the kettle home the tinker believed he had made an excellent deal. That night the tinker was woken by a voice calling him. He looked up to see a kettle with a badger head, tail and feet. The badger/kettle told him that he was not an ordinary kettle, but a badger who could transform himself into a kettle and his name was Bumbuku (Good Luck). He said he was willing to be of service to the man and that the priest had not understood his value and has subjected him to pain. Bumbuku said if he were treated with respect and fed rice cakes he would, in return, perform acrobatic feats and dances. So the tinker built an outdoor theatre and advertised performances of "Bumbuku, The Magic Teakettle of Good Luck, and His Extraordinary Tricks". The most popular trick was when Bumbuku walked across a tight rope, carrying a parasol and a fan. The act became very popular and at the end of twenty days the tinker became rich. He was concerned about overworking Bumbuku and had enough money to be comfortable for the rest of his life. After talking with Bumbuku he took an offering and the kettle back to the priest. He told the priest what had happened and asked if Bumbuku could retire to the temple, be fed rice cakes and not be put over a fire. The priest agreed and put him in an honored place in the temple's treasure house, where he remains to this day.
1996.010.038 Fan Uchiwa style flat fan. Sumi ink painting on one side shows Bumbuku the badger with a tea kettle body walking a tightrope while carrying a fan with a red dot in the middle in his right paw and a parasol in his left; at middle right is a small red seal. On the reverse is a black inscription: "To my teacher, Georgia Sealoff, from Yagi" with the date 1954, 8.14. The fan is made of white paper adhered to thin bamboo spokes radiating from a lower central silk cloth sandwiched between a slot in the carved bamboo handle, which has speckled bark on the painting side. Story of Bumbuku Chagama or The Magic Tea Kettle A priest at the Morinji Buddhist temple in Tatebayashi, Kotszke was very fond of the tea ceremony and he often looked for beautiful utensils. He polished an old tea kettle he had found at a second hand shop and put it aside. One day as he was admiring the beautifully shaped kettle he fell asleep. Suddenly the tea kettle sprouted a badger head, tail and legs and began to move around. The priest's pupils next door rushed in when they heard a noise and were astonished to see the badger/tea kettle, but when they woke the priest the kettle resumed its former shape. He did not believe what they told him and that evening he decided to make tea with the tea kettle. The kettle got hotter and hotter as the water heated over the brazier and the kettle quickly turned into a badger and jumped away. When they caught up with the kettle it once again resumed its ordinary shape. Thinking that the kettle must be bewitched, the priest decided to get rid of it. He offered to sell it to a tinker (a junkman who fixes items to resell) for a very cheap price. The tinker asked why he would want to sell such a nice kettle cheaply. The priest answered that he had other kettles. Taking the kettle home the tinker believed he had made an excellent deal. That night the tinker was woken by a voice calling him. He looked up to see a kettle with a badger head, tail and feet. The badger/kettle told him that he was not an ordinary kettle, but a badger who could transform himself into a kettle and his name was Bumbuku (Good Luck). He said he was willing to be of service to the man and that the priest had not understood his value and has subjected him to pain. Bumbuku said if he were treated with respect and fed rice cakes he would, in return, perform acrobatic feats and dances. So the tinker built an outdoor theatre and advertised performances of "Bumbuku, The Magic Teakettle of Good Luck, and His Extraordinary Tricks". The most popular trick was when Bumbuku walked across a tight rope, carrying a parasol and a fan. The act became very popular and at the end of twenty days the tinker became rich. He was concerned about overworking Bumbuku and had enough money to be comfortable for the rest of his life. After talking with Bumbuku he took an offering and the kettle back to the priest. He told the priest what had happened and asked if Bumbuku could retire to the temple, be fed rice cakes and not be put over a fire. The priest agreed and put him in an honored place in the temple's treasure house, where he remains to this day.
1996.010.040 Lanterns 2 Identical Paper Lanterns a, b: Paper glued to concentric rings, top and bottom rings of wood painted black, metal handle at top, metal candle holder stuck to bottom inside. Globe shape when opened, can be squeezed down to flatten. On one side is badger/tea kettle, brown badger with blue around his eyes, grey and black kettle. Story of Bumbuku Chagama or The Magic Tea Kettle A priest at the Morinji Buddhist temple in Tatebayashi, Kotszke was very fond of the tea ceremony and he often looked for beautiful utensils. He polished an old tea kettle he had found at a second hand shop and put it aside. One day as he was admiring the beautifully shaped kettle he fell asleep. Suddenly the tea kettle sprouted a badger head, tail and legs and began to move around. The priest's pupils next door rushed in when they heard a noise and were astonished to see the badger/tea kettle, but when they woke the priest the kettle resumed its former shape. He did not believe what they told him and that evening he decided to make tea with the tea kettle. The kettle got hotter and hotter as the water heated over the brazier and the kettle quickly turned into a badger and jumped away. When they caught up with the kettle it once again resumed its ordinary shape. Thinking that the kettle must be bewitched, the priest decided to get rid of it. He offered to sell it to a tinker (a junkman who fixes items to resell) for a very cheap price. The tinker asked why he would want to sell such a nice kettle cheaply. The priest answered that he had other kettles. Taking the kettle home the tinker believed he had made an excellent deal. That night the tinker was woken by a voice calling him. He looked up to see a kettle with a badger head, tail and feet. The badger/kettle told him that he was not an ordinary kettle, but a badger who could transform himself into a kettle and his name was Bumbuku (Good Luck). He said he was willing to be of service to the man and that the priest had not understood his value and has subjected him to pain. Bumbuku said if he were treated with respect and fed rice cakes he would, in return, perform acrobatic feats and dances. So the tinker built an outdoor theatre and advertised performances of "Bumbuku, The Magic Teakettle of Good Luck, and His Extraordinary Tricks". The most popular trick was when Bumbuku walked across a tight rope, carrying a parasol and a fan. The act became very popular and at the end of twenty days the tinker became rich. He was concerned about overworking Bumbuku and had enough money to be comfortable for the rest of his life. After talking with Bumbuku he took an offering and the kettle back to the priest. He told the priest what had happened and asked if Bumbuku could retire to the temple, be fed rice cakes and not be put over a fire. The priest agreed and put him in an honored place in the temple's treasure house, where he remains to this day.
1996.010.041 Origami Origami Bumbuku (Badger/Tea Kettle) Brown soft strong paper folded from one piece in the shape of a badger/tea kettle. The paper is rusty brown on one side and dark brown on the other and it is folded so that the dark brown is in the shape of the kettle and the badger's nose; the rest of the body is rusty brown. Story of Bunbuku Chagama or The Magic Tea Kettle A priest at the Morinji Buddhist temple in Tatebayashi, Kotszke was very fond of the tea ceremony and he often looked for beautiful utensils. He polished an old tea kettle he had found at a second hand shop and put it aside. One day as he was admiring the beautifully shaped kettle he fell asleep. Suddenly the tea kettle sprouted a badger head, tail and legs and began to move around. The priest's pupils next door rushed in when they heard a noise and were astonished to see the badger/tea kettle, but when they woke the priest the kettle resumed its former shape. He did not believe what they told him and that evening he decided to make tea with the tea kettle. The kettle got hotter and hotter as the water heated over the brazier and the kettle quickly turned into a badger and jumped away. When they caught up with the kettle it once again resumed its ordinary shape. Thinking that the kettle must be bewitched, the priest decided to get rid of it. He offered to sell it to a tinker (a junkman who fixes items to resell) for a very cheap price. The tinker asked why he would want to sell such a nice kettle cheaply. The priest answered that he had other kettles. Taking the kettle home the tinker believed he had made an excellent deal. That night the tinker was woken by a voice calling him. He looked up to see a kettle with a badger head, tail and feet. The badger/kettle told him that he was not an ordinary kettle, but a badger who could transform himself into a kettle and his name was Bumbuku (Good Luck). He said he was willing to be of service to the man and that the priest had not understood his value and has subjected him to pain. Bumbuku said if he were treated with respect and fed rice cakes he would, in return, perform acrobatic feats and dances. So the tinker built an outdoor theatre and advertised performances of "Bumbuku, The Magic Teakettle of Good Luck, and His Extraordinary Tricks". The most popular trick was when Bumbuku walked across a tight rope, carrying a parasol and a fan. The act became very popular and at the end of twenty days the tinker became rich. He was concerned about overworking Bumbuku and had enough money to be comfortable for the rest of his life. After talking with Bumbuku he took an offering and the kettle back to the priest. He told the priest what had happened and asked if Bumbuku could retire to the temple, be fed rice cakes and not be put over a fire. The priest agreed and put him in an honored place in the temple's treasure house, where he remains to this day.
1996.010.042 Diorama Diorama of Bumbuku Chagama (Badger/Teakettle) A: Inside a cardboard frame angles to form a stage with a background of Mount Fuji, blue sky, pink land, purple mountain with white snow, patches of green, sides, bottom and top are yellow with blue curtains. Across the top of the stage is a red banner with kanji and the initials JLS printed in blue. On the left is the flat figure of the tinker with checked brown pants, checked green vest, holding an open fan in one hand and a folded fan in the other. Above the floor hanging from a red cord and on a "tightwire" of white and purple string is the brown badger/tea kettle (black bottom, gold lid and handles) made of papier mache. He carries a red with white petal designed parasol with painted spokes. Probably used to teach children about the Bumbuku Chagama story. B: Rectangular white box with paper lace edging forms container for diarama. Story of Bunbuku Chagama or The Magic Tea Kettle A priest at the Morinji Buddhist temple in Tatebayashi, Kotszke was very fond of the tea ceremony and he often looked for beautiful utensils. He polished an old tea kettle he had found at a second hand shop and put it aside. One day as he was admiring the beautifully shaped kettle he fell asleep. Suddenly the tea kettle sprouted a badger head, tail and legs and began to move around. The priest's pupils next door rushed in when they heard a noise and were astonished to see the badger/tea kettle, but when they woke the priest the kettle resumed its former shape. He did not believe what they told him and that evening he decided to make tea with the tea kettle. The kettle got hotter and hotter as the water heated over the brazier and the kettle quickly turned into a badger and jumped away. When they caught up with the kettle it once again resumed its ordinary shape. Thinking that the kettle must be bewitched, the priest decided to get rid of it. He offered to sell it to a tinker (a junkman who fixes items to resell) for a very cheap price. The tinker asked why he would want to sell such a nice kettle cheaply. The priest answered that he had other kettles. Taking the kettle home the tinker believed he had made an excellent deal. That night the tinker was woken by a voice calling him. He looked up to see a kettle with a badger head, tail and feet. The badger/kettle told him that he was not an ordinary kettle, but a badger who could transform himself into a kettle and his name was Bumbuku (Good Luck). He said he was willing to be of service to the man and that the priest had not understood his value and has subjected him to pain. Bumbuku said if he were treated with respect and fed rice cakes he would, in return, perform acrobatic feats and dances. So the tinker built an outdoor theatre and advertised performances of "Bumbuku, The Magic Teakettle of Good Luck, and His Extraordinary Tricks". The most popular trick was when Bumbuku walked across a tight rope, carrying a parasol and a fan. The act became very popular and at the end of twenty days the tinker became rich. He was concerned about overworking Bumbuku and had enough money to be comfortable for the rest of his life. After talking with Bumbuku he took an offering and the kettle back to the priest. He told the priest what had happened and asked if Bumbuku could retire to the temple, be fed rice cakes and not be put over a fire. The priest agreed and put him in an honored place in the temple's treasure house, where he remains to this day.
1996.010.043 Ornaments Pair of gourd ornaments Each ornament is cut from side of a gourd and pyro engraved . A.: Engraved at left is a badger/tea kettle, at right two red lilies with a bud, stems and leaves. Kanji: either "Tate" or "Kado Bayashi" (a person's name) is above badger and flowers. At the top are two holes in which grommets have been inserted and black cord is inserted. Kanji: "Morinji" B: Similar to A except that the flowers are not filled with color. Story of Bumbuku Chagama or The Magic Tea Kettle A priest at the Morinji Buddhist temple in Tatebayashi, Kotszke was very fond of the tea ceremony and he often looked for beautiful utensils. He polished an old tea kettle he had found at a second hand shop and put it aside. One day as he was admiring the beautifully shaped kettle he fell asleep. Suddenly the tea kettle sprouted a badger head, tail and legs and began to move around. The priest's pupils next door rushed in when they heard a noise and were astonished to see the badger/tea kettle, but when they woke the priest the kettle resumed its former shape. He did not believe what they told him and that evening he decided to make tea with the tea kettle. The kettle got hotter and hotter as the water heated over the brazier and the kettle quickly turned into a badger and jumped away. When they caught up with the kettle it once again resumed its ordinary shape. Thinking that the kettle must be bewitched, the priest decided to get rid of it. He offered to sell it to a tinker (a junkman who fixes items to resell) for a very cheap price. The tinker asked why he would want to sell such a nice kettle cheaply. The priest answered that he had other kettles. Taking the kettle home the tinker believed he had made an excellent deal. That night the tinker was woken by a voice calling him. He looked up to see a kettle with a badger head, tail and feet. The badger/kettle told him that he was not an ordinary kettle, but a badger who could transform himself into a kettle and his name was Bumbuku (Good Luck). He said he was willing to be of service to the man and that the priest had not understood his value and has subjected him to pain. Bumbuku said if he were treated with respect and fed rice cakes he would, in return, perform acrobatic feats and dances. So the tinker built an outdoor theatre and advertised performances of "Bumbuku, The Magic Teakettle of Good Luck, and His Extraordinary Tricks". The most popular trick was when Bumbuku walked across a tight rope, carrying a parasol and a fan. The act became very popular and at the end of twenty days the tinker became rich. He was concerned about overworking Bumbuku and had enough money to be comfortable for the rest of his life. After talking with Bumbuku he took an offering and the kettle back to the priest. He told the priest what had happened and asked if Bumbuku could retire to the temple, be fed rice cakes and not be put over a fire. The priest agreed and put him in an honored place in the temple's treasure house, where he remains to this day.
1996.010.044 Container Carved wood container A: Kettle body, Turned wood in the shape of a tea kettle. . B: Wood top screws on. C: knob on top is removeable, as well as top itself. Story of Bunbuku Chagama or The Magic Tea Kettle A priest at the Morinji Buddhist temple in Tatebayashi, Kotszke was very fond of the tea ceremony and he often looked for beautiful utensils. He polished an old tea kettle he had found at a second hand shop and put it aside. One day as he was admiring the beautifully shaped kettle he fell asleep. Suddenly the tea kettle sprouted a badger head, tail and legs and began to move around. The priest's pupils next door rushed in when they heard a noise and were astonished to see the badger/tea kettle, but when they woke the priest the kettle resumed its former shape. He did not believe what they told him and that evening he decided to make tea with the tea kettle. The kettle got hotter and hotter as the water heated over the brazier and the kettle quickly turned into a badger and jumped away. When they caught up with the kettle it once again resumed its ordinary shape. Thinking that the kettle must be bewitched, the priest decided to get rid of it. He offered to sell it to a tinker (a junkman who fixes items to resell) for a very cheap price. The tinker asked why he would want to sell such a nice kettle cheaply. The priest answered that he had other kettles. Taking the kettle home the tinker believed he had made an excellent deal. That night the tinker was woken by a voice calling him. He looked up to see a kettle with a badger head, tail and feet. The badger/kettle told him that he was not an ordinary kettle, but a badger who could transform himself into a kettle and his name was Bumbuku (Good Luck). He said he was willing to be of service to the man and that the priest had not understood his value and has subjected him to pain. Bumbuku said if he were treated with respect and fed rice cakes he would, in return, perform acrobatic feats and dances. So the tinker built an outdoor theatre and advertised performances of "Bumbuku, The Magic Teakettle of Good Luck, and His Extraordinary Tricks". The most popular trick was when Bumbuku walked across a tight rope, carrying a parasol and a fan. The act became very popular and at the end of twenty days the tinker became rich. He was concerned about overworking Bumbuku and had enough money to be comfortable for the rest of his life. After talking with Bumbuku he took an offering and the kettle back to the priest. He told the priest what had happened and asked if Bumbuku could retire to the temple, be fed rice cakes and not be put over a fire. The priest agreed and put him in an honored place in the temple's treasure house, where he remains to this day.
1996.010.045 Doll set Set of 2 dolls--Tachibina Couple Dolls are affixed to salmon colored card with gold flecks (smaller one is loose). Tallest doll wears gold and tan brocade hakama and orange and gold brocade kimono, shortest doll wears wrap around gold and orange brocade kimono fastened with a gold and green obi, has 4 layers of eri (collars) red, white, orange. Heads are of painted wood with short black cropped hair, smaller one has two hair braids extending down on both sides, white painted faces with black eyes and two dark spots on forehead, red painted lips. Stored in lidded cardboard box. Tachibina or standing dolls are thought to be the ancestors of the Dairibina or Imperial Couple or figures for ancestor worship or the personification of the male and female principle. Upright dolls that cannot stand without support... (see The Image and the Motif: Japanese Dolls by Lea Baten, p. 51.
1996.010.046 Doll Ornament Paper Doll Ornament 2 dolls affixed to paper covered wood with paper support on back, top is red with blue and white floral design, middle stripe with silver flecks, bottom band of green paper. Larger figure is wearing a gold colored hat (eboshi), purple and white paper kimono with red floral design, gold obi, paper hakama is black with green, blue, pink and red peach on one side. Smaller figure has long black hair tied with small piece of metal wire, blue and red eri (collars), black, beige, red patterned kimono. Bodies are filled with cotton and heads are made of painted papier mache.
1996.010.047 Miniature Dolls Set of 3 miniature dolls Doll heads are painted white (possibly with gofun shell) with painted eyes, red lips, pink cheeks, white painted carved wood hands and feet, in standing position a) Has black silk hair cut short with bangs, dressed in white silk cloth glued to body, gold paper obi, white paper skirt b) Has black silk hair cut short with bangs and topknot of hair tied with piece of red cloth, painted blue eyes, dressed in blue silk cloth glued over shoulders, gold paper obi, white paper skirt c) Shaven head except of topknot of hair tied with orange thread, painted black curl on side of head
1996.010.048 Doll Boy Doll with Gosho style head and Kamo style kimekomi body Pink colored hairless head, gofun covered wood, painted black eyebrows, eyes, rust colored eye accents and lips, wearing orange and white silk kumihimo braid tied around head. Wearing full set of armor made of black cloth pushed into wooden body form (kimekomi) painted with red and white dots representing connecting braids, shoulder plates painted with pink, gold, blue and red design, kimono is red, gold and orange brocade, white silk damask belt, gold painted sword with green cord stuck in belt, gold and green brocade pants (mompei?) tied with gold braid, hands are painted green with white dots representing gloves, feet are painted green and yellow with white dots. Wearing metal pouch quiver or pouch nailed to his back containing wood axe, long handled saw, long handled sythe, staff, 3 pronged rake, mallet. Fastened to a black lacquered wood stand. Japanese Antique Dolls, Gosho, p. 42, Kamo, p. 46; The Image and the Motif Japanese Dolls, Gosho p. 37, Kamo p.40
1996.010.049 Doll Standing Geisha Holding Samurai Helmet: Yaegakihime Face is molded and covered with white silk with painted black eyebrows, and eyes, some red around eyes as well as red lips. Black hair is tied up with a small portion hanging down. Elaborate hair piece made of metal, wire, gold and orange covered wire with silver and yellow flowers, and silver and orange butterflies. Red bow in back and red paper fans out from back of hair. She is wearing red under robe, then a silver and white brocade robe. The outer kimono is red crepe lined, and is white with printed floral pattern in orange, red, purple, yellow and pink. Obi is red, gold and white brocade and hangs loosely in back. The obijime is red crepe. Feet are covered as if wearing tabi. Hands are covered in white cloth. She is holding a helmet made of paper and metal. The top is covered by a swath of white hair tied with a piece of paper. The top of the helmet is black with two layers of gold tied by orange cord. The front of the helmet has an orange gold brocade and metal horns and design. There is an orange cord with tassels hanging from the helmet. The doll is in a wood and glass case that is 22'' tall, 9" deep, and 12" wide. It is made of red lacquered wood that is joined without glue so that it comes apart. The bottom is covered by red cloth and the back ground is silver paper. There is a metal latch on the door that has a tan tassel. Yaegakihime On the Kabuki stage Yaegakihime is a beautiful princess in the play "Honcho Nijushi Ko" which tells of various incidents in the feud between the families of Takeda and Nagao. The Shogun Ashikaga Yoshiteru has been murdered and the two families take opposing sides pretending to be bitter enemies in order to discover the assassin which they succeed in doing. Yaegakihime is the daughter of Nagao and is in love with Katsuyori, the son of Takeda. The quarrel between the two families interferes with their love affair and Katsuyori was believed to have committted suicide on the eve of his wedding because of the family differences. He appears disguised as a gardner to recover an heirloom helmet entrusted by his father to the Suwa Hosho Shrine. But the priests have given it to his enemy. Yaegakihime who believes Katsuyori to be alive, hears of her father's plan to have him killed. The father sends the disguised gardner to Shiojiri, a town on the other side of Lake Suwa, but the lake is frozen over and the assissins wait to ambush him on his return. Yaegakihime wants to warn Katsuyori and she takes the helmet from the shrine. Arriving at the lake, which she cannot cross on her own, she sees a reflection of a fox (the shrine is dedicated to the fox spirit). She puts on the helmet and the fox-spirits lead her across the frozen lake. Sakura Dolls of Japan: Their Stories, Appreciation and Creations by M.S. Abston and Y. Uchioke.
1996.010.050 Doll (A) Dancing doll costumed for the wisteria dance: Fuji Musume - Wisteria Girl In dancing position with head slightly tilted. Her left hand is holding a faded wisteria branch and her right is holding out the sleeve of her kimono. Her face is gofun covered, with painted eyebrows, glass eyes, red painted lips. Her hair is cut at shoulder length with bangs cut above the eyebrows. She is wearing a red underrobe, then a red and gold brocade kimono which is visible only on the right side. The outer kimono is orange cloth printed with blue, yellow, green and white leaf pattern. It has a white lining. The obi is the same red and gold brocade and hangs down in back. Her feet are painted like tabi. She is wearing a hat that is round and flat with painted flowers and leaves, and has an orange cord with tassels tied at chin. The wisteria branch is made of paper and paper covered wire. (B) She is in a glass and red lacquered wood box that is 14" tall, 10 " wide and 7.75" deep; it is joined without glue and comes apart. Fuji Musume - Wisteria Girl This is a kabuki dance play performed by a young girl carrying a wisteria branch on her shoulder. The story tells about a priest walking past Tago Bay and stops to admire some wisteria blossoms in full bloom. A woman appears and talks to him revealing that she is the spirit of the wisteria flower. She leads him through the garden and spreads her robe, dances, and sings of the four seasons and the flowers. In the moonlight her shadow is purple. At daybreak she expells sweet perfume and disappears in the morning haze. The priest gazes at the flowers with tearful eyes, and kisses their drooping leaves, then binds them into sheaves for the Lord of Paradise. "They shall all bloom in the fields he says, and smiles, transplanted by my care, and all shall wear the sacred bloosom upon their white lapel." Sakura Dolls of Japan: Their Stories, Appreciation and Creations by M.S. Abston and Y. Uchioke, p. 38.
1996.010.051 Doll Set Girls Day Festival Display Dolls, Hina Matsuri Ceramic figurines of the Emperor and Empress in seated position. He is painted in gold hat and black kimono, with painted hair and face and two dots on forehead. She is wearing a gold hat with a pink kimono with red flowers. She has painted hair and face and two dots on forehead. Behind them are two standing lanterns painted red with cloth bodies. Behind that is a pine tree with brown trunk , green moss on the side and green folliage. They are seated on a dais of wood covered with green cloth and painted in the front with green, white, red and blue stripes. A removable glass case covers it all and it is secured to the wooden stand by an orange cord tied around top. The back panel of glass is blacked in. The base of the wooden stand is painted red.
1996.010.052 Doll Ornament Doll Ornament Paper Tachihina dolls in a cardboard box. The dolls are attached to a pink and silver colored piece of cardboard. Gofun covered wood heads with black painted hair. They have painted eyes and red lips, and two dots on their foreheads. Heads are mounted on sticks which go into the bodies. The taller male figure is wearing a paper hat tied with a string. His kimono is gold and orange brocade, and his belt and hakama are gold and tan brocade. The smaller female figure has two strands of natural hair hanging down on the sides. She has four underlayers of white and red and her kimono is orange and gold brocade with a gold and tan brocade obi. Box is green with silver flecks.
1996.010.053 Doll Baby Cloth Doll Head is padded piece of white silk with no face. Body of wadding is wrapped with faux tie dyed (Kanoko Shibori) crepe cloth, white on red which is edged with light green silk forming a channel for a tie. Tie is made up of one white and one orange kumihimo cord which draws the red cover together in the front like swaddling clothes. The back is drawn together in pleats. Possibly the infant prince Ojin who is rescued by his faithful retainer Takenouchi?
1996.010.054 Doll Female Cloth Doll Rolled cloth body with round head made of stuffed cotton cloth. Black yarn hair tied up with red silk crepe, no face. Under collars consist of white cotton, red crepe; kimono is striped blue and yellowish meisen silk, lined with purple tsumugi silk which is padded; the kimono which has a black collar is wrapped around the body which has no arms and fastened with an obi made of silk crepe having a pattern in dark and light orange and brown, tied in a "bow" at the back. The obi has a turquoise ribbed silk tie around the top (obi age) and a purple ribbed silk tie around the middle (obi jime). The doll is stored in a plastic tube with a lid and red trim. Tachibina or Anesam style.
1996.010.055 Doll Male Figure Jumping a Post Shaped round head with gofun (shell) finish, black painted hair including shaped topknot, black painted eyes, eyebrows and two forehead dots, red painted mouth. Body made in kimekomi method: pulverized wood bound with adhesive and shaped; orange brocade collar and gold and tan brocade robe (Shinto style) pressed into wood form, white sash visible in back and tab in front; purple and gold brocade pants (faded in front). Feet and hands are white painted wood, with pained black geta and red straps, holding a gold paper fan (torn) in right hand. He is in a jumping position attached to a lacquer painted post (possibly fence or bridge post) which has a black shaped finial and orangey red bottom, adhered to a black lacquer wood base. The Kimekomi method was used at the Kamo Shrine where dolls would be sold as souvenirs and charms. The pulverized wood was Paulownia. Contemporary dolls are made in the kimekomi method but are not real Kamo dolls. See The Image and the Motif: Japanese Dolls by Lea Baten, p. 41. Benkei at the Bridge?
1996.010.056 Doll Doll with fan representing Yuya of Noh play A: Doll made by the kimekomi technique of palownia wood paste shaped and grooved, fabric is applied with glue and pressed into grooves, inserted head and hands. Long black fiber hair hangs down on either side and back is tied with gold colored string, parted in center; wears mask held by orange and gold brocade narrow band which circles top of head with bow cascading down back, mask which depicts young woman is gofun finish and has painted black hair lines parted in center, faint black eyebrows high on forehead, curved eyes: black irises with outline, partially open red mouth. Outer kimono is silk brocade with orange background with gold wave motif, floral pattern of plum, 7 autumn flowers, pine, bamboo on gold pine bark lonzenge shape background; undergarment showing at collar and sleeve is white with gold cloud design, under collar of white. Right arm extended holding folded fan in hand with gofun finish, left arm and hand held in front at waist; at front edge, hem and bottom made with orange kodai chirimen (wave textured crepe). Knees slightly bent in position to move forward slowly. Both white tabi feet close together show at front and bottom. B: Miniature paper folding fan, painted gold flake background (kinpaku) with green, brown and black knarled pine tree design, spokes of dark wood, H: 2.25", W: 3" open. Yuya is name of young, gentle, beautiful maident, highly educated and refined. She left her mother and lives with her lord, Munemori. One day she is told that her mother is ill, but she is not allowed to return home, but must go to the flower viewing with him. She cannot suppress the pain in her heart. She gives him such beautiful, moving poem and he permits her to return to her ailing mother. So this doll is a depiction of Yuya starting out to view flowers while dealing with the thought of her mother. Face wears the mask of a young maiden.
1996.010.057 Doll Oyster Shucking Figure on Platform (A) Seated female doll made of wood/straw covered with cloth. Head made of wood and covered with gofun, glass eyes, black features and red painted lips, black fiber hair with cut bangs; hair covered with scarf of black polka dots on white silk, black kimono with white window pane weave in bast fiber, sleeves have red crepe silk lining and are tied back with red band, obi is a red patterned white silk band with a black satin border tied in "bow" at back with white obi jime cord tied around middle; yellow apron with red, green and dark yellow plaid design extends over lap. Feet of gofun covered wood have white silk sandals with orange straps inserted between toes as if she were wearing tabi. Hands of gofun covered wood: right hand holds wood tool (possibly broken), left hand holds miniature oyster shell. She sits on block of wood attached by wooden peg to wood platform. (B) Wood flat bottom bowl with black lacquered finish around outside and red lacquered inside and 2 bands on outside, bottom unfinished. Resembles wood slat container. Dia.: 3.75", H: .75" (C) Wooden sign, tall narrow board with carved base and pointed roof detail, triangular standing support on back, clear lacquer finish with kanji printed in black on front and back: "Noted Hiroshima Oyster Shucking Girl". H: 4", D: .75" (D) Wooden block, rectangular shape with lacquer finish with kanji printed black on 4 sides (3 sides are the same: "Raw Oysters", 4th side: "Junidan-ya" (name of store). H: 1.75", W: .50" Card says this is the Oyster Girl of Hiroshima
1996.010.058 Doll Baby Boy Play Doll Molded body, head, hands and feet painted flesh color; head is attached to body with string and has painted black eyebrows and eyelashes, red mouth, brown and black inset glass eyes, painted rosy cheeks and on ears, dark color painted near hairline, real straight dark hair with bowl shaped haircut. Legs and arms are bent and attached with the string to the body. He wears kimono of red silk with floral design (wisteria, bamboo, cherry, plum, chrysanthemums, peony) and water design in yellow, pink, blue, green, white, purple colors and gold flecks, lined with pink crepe (faded); underneath show white color and sleeve edgings of yellow and white; yellow obi only visible in front; red crepe vest with white silk lining and gold flecks, tied in front.
1996.010.059 Doll Miniature Mochi Eating Figure on Platform Figure appears to be seated but the seat is missing. Stuffed cloth head with white face and painted features, black tuft of fiber for hair sticks out at front of kerchief folded around head (red and gray on white plaid); jacket of red, white printed cloth, black cloth belt and pants of black with pink and gray stripes, feet covered with pink cloth. In her lap is a wood shaving curled up to form a container for two white mochi balls (wadded cotton); she holds a mochi ball up to her mouth with her right hand, hands are covered with white silk. She is glued to a slice of birch with bark showing around outer rim.
1996.010.060 Dolls 2 Miniature Baby Dolls Painted molded wood pulp?, painted features, figures are lying on their stomachs (A) Full head of dark short cropped fiber hair, painted eyebrows, eyes (blue), painted red mouth; wearing a red on white piece tie dyed crepe silk glued to front, yellow ribbon tied around waist, on bottom of figure on ribbon is written the work "hoko". (B) Small black fiber topknot tied with red string, painted blue pate, painted black hair strands near temples, painted eyebrows, eyes (blue), wearing dyed blue crepe silk glued to front, yellow ribbon tied around waist, on bottom of figure on ribbon is written the work "hoko" and "Japan" stamped on bottom.
1996.010.061 Doll Female figure standing in snow Stuffed doll has white silk face with painted features, black fiber bangs stick out front of red and white flannel hat which extends down the back, tied with red cotton scarf around neck; on top is a vest, jacket beneath shows kimono style sleeves, jacket is black with orange and white threads, vest is blue, white on pinstriped black and purple, black pants with orange stripe, small orange cloth belt; hands covered with white and red cotton mittens, wearing straw snow boots tied with tan thread. Stands on cotton batting representing snow adhered to a slice of birch with bark on outside. She holds a wooden snow shovel between her chest and upturned arms. On the bottom is written in pencil "Yamagata Prefecture".
1996.010.062 Doll Figurines 2 doll figurines Figures are made of painted ceramic in an olive green color with painted features on large heads, conical bodies, arms ending in points. (A) Standing figurine with hands held up in sleeping position, holding an orange and yellow painted flower, two painted black hair like lines with a white bow on both sides of head, painted black eyes, red mouth, conical shaped body has 3 leaf shaped motifs at bottom front in yellow, red and blue outlined with black. (B) Standing figurine with right hand held up to chin and left hand extended to side, two painted black hair like lines with a white bow on both sides of head, painted black eyes, red mouth, conical shaped body has 3butterfly shaped motifs at bottom front in yellow, red and blue outlined with black.
1996.010.063 Boy Figurine Ceramic Chinese Style Boy Figurine Seated figure has large head with molded and painted black hair in topknot, bangs and side hair pieces in the style of "100 Chinese boys" with blued painted pate, painted black eyesbrows, black and brown eyes, red lips; has a painted blue jacket with white well head design, light blue at neckline, peach color at sleeve edge, orange belt, rusty brown pants with yellow patches showing stitches at knees extend to just below knees, crossed legs, he holds a broken sandal strap (painted wire) in his hand with yellow sandal bottom showing, green painted bottom.
1996.010.064 Figurine 2 Male Gosho Doll Figures on divided wood platform Both figures are plump and painted white (gofun?) with Chinese boy style hair cuts. The figure on the left is down on his right knee, he has a brown colored helmet with gold and white brocade ribbon tied in the back tied with yellow cord under his chin, tuft of fiber hair sticking out from underneath his helmet, painted features, painted green vest with gold medallion/leaf design, red and gold brocade silk glued to his chest, holding a fan in his right hand and brown tortoise with green and yellow streamers in his raised left hand. The figure on the right is standing, he has a helmet with a crane nesting on his head (two wires stick out the back like tail feathers) and a white cord ties under his chin, painted features: black eyebrows, eyes, red lips, two side tails of fiber hair tied with green cord on either side of his head, painted orange vest with gold floral design, turquoise and gold brocade glued to his chest, holding an open ceramic fan painted with pine trees in his right hand. They stand on a two-tied unpainted wood stand with four legs. Gosho dolls (gosho ningyo) looked like plump little boys with white skin and Chinese style haircuts which were originally given as gifts to visiting aristocracy in Kyoto. They appear in a variety of poses.
1996.010.065 Doll Miniature Gosho Doll Figure on Platform (A) Figure stands on left leg, holding lion mask in raised right hand. Ceramic figure is plump and painted white (gofun?) with Chinese boy style hair cut, painted tuft of hair tied with painted orange ribbon on top of head, painted eyebrows, eyes and red lips, two side pieces of fiber hair on either side of head. Wears a painted white motif green ribbon glued over shoulders, red cloth with painted pink flower glued to chest, orange cord around waist. Lion mask is molded and painted orangey red with black and gold features. (B) Unpainted wood platform, rectangular shape. Gosho dolls (gosho ningyo) looked like plump little boys with white skin and Chinese style haircuts which were originally given as gifts to visiting aristocracy in Kyoto. They appear in a variety of poses.
1996.010.066 Miniature Doll Figure Miniature ceramic figure on platform representing Kanjin-kho Kabuki character Standing painted Benkei figure on black stand in lidded box (A) Figure has round white face with painted features and bald head, molded "bell-hop" hat painted black with hole through which a yellow cord is tied under his chin. Painted clothes include black vest with gold design, orange neck bands with gold medallions, robe of brown and gray on yellow plaid, white obi, hakama of grey with silver design, painted white tabi, hilt of sword sticks out from his belt, hands are white painted wires which once held a paper scroll. (B) Black lacquered rectangular wood platform, unfinished bottom (C) Unfinished wood box, H: 3", W: 2.5", D: 2" (D) Unfinished wood lid which slides into top of box, decorative molding, kanji written in black, "Kanjincho Kabuki" written in pencil. Kabuki Play "Kanjincho" Legend of the Subscription List Benkei frees himself and his companions from many difficult situations and is an loyal follower of Yoshitsune, who is a powerful leader of the feudal can at Genji. Kanjincho tells the story of Lord Yoshitsune and his loyal followers who have been falsely suspected of intrigue by his jealous brother, the Shogun. They escape north to Mutsu where they must pass through barriers set up by the Shogun. They disguise themselves as soliciting priests. As they cross the barrier check-point of Ataka, their ruse is sensed by its keeper Togashi Saemon. Benkei asked permission to pass for the reason of collecting funds for the reconstruction of their temple which had been destroyed by fire. Togashi refushes their passage and Bendei proposes a Buddhist service. Tagashi asks if they have a Kanjincho, which is a scroll used by priests subscribing to a particular charity. Benkei pulls out a blank scroll and pretends to read but Tagashi is suspicious and asks him questions about his clothing and the Buddhist religion. Togashi is impressed with his distinct answers even though he is suspicious and lets them pass. When one of Togashi's soldiers recognizes Yoshitsune they are called back and begin to fight. Benkei realizes a disturbance would be fatal at this time and proceeds to beat his disguised lord Yoshitsune for starting the commotion. Togashi fully realizes it is Yoshisune and is astounded that Benkei would strike his lord to save him. He lets them pass once again even though he is being disloyal to his own lord and later contemplates suicide because of this. Yoshitsune forgives Benkei for the beating and they drink and Benkei dances the dance of Longevity. Sakura Dolls of Japan: Their Stories, Appreciation and Creations, p. 66. Kabuki (Color Books) by Yasuji Toita & Chiaki Yoshida, p. 19.
1996.010.067 Doll Gosho Doll Set Two Dolls in Lidded Wooden Box. A: Seated figure of young boy carved from wood and covered with gofun, large, round bald head with tiny carved nose, mouth, and chin dimple and ears, black painted sideburns, eyebrows and eyes, red painted lips. Wears eboshi, gold painted hat, which is moulded with depression in the front, glued to the top of the head and tied under the chin with red silk cord. Red satin band with green fringe tied around neck. Body is carved with grooves into which an orange, gold and white vest is pressed. Accents of silver, purple and gold on each side of the bare white knees. Small blue cord tied in a knot in center front. White puddgy arms and hands with red finger nails. Carved as part of the figure is what looks like a white bird but is actually a sea bream on his knee. It has painted orange, gold,green, black, and blue markings. B: Seated figure of young boy carved from wood and covered with gofun, large, round bald head with tiny carved nose, mouth, and chin dimple and ears, black painted sideburns, eyebrows and eyes, red painted lips. Wears eboshi, gold painted hat, which is moulded with depression in the front, glued to the top of the head and tied under the chin with red silk cord. Red satin band with green fringe tied around neck. Body is carved with grooves into which an orange, gold and white vest is pressed. Accents of silver, purple and gold on each side of the bare white knees. Small blue cord tied in a knot in center front. White pudgy arms and hands with red finger nails. Carved as part of the figure is what looks like a white bird but is actually a sea bream on his knee. It has painted orange, gold,green, black, and blue markings. Has chip out of right eyebrow. C & D: Wooden Box, H: 3", W: 4", D: 5", On bottom of box is written "Gosho - Ningyo" On the lid is label of gold speckled paper with black ink kanji "Meditai Mochi" (Sea bream as symbol for happy occasion). Inside the lid is an explanatory card in Japapnese, with picture of a pink Mt. fuji. At one end is Japanese character inside a circle.Fukugawa Ceramics, started 320 years ago, started making Arita ware from clay, trademark is Mount Fuji, in Meiji era 43 they received imperial household order because of the beautiful porcelain lustre they produced and lead slip. Sent to World Fair in St. Louis they won first prize; received over 200 awards for their work. In Showa 37 they changed their method to make bone china to surpass English china. In Showa 46 built a factory to mass produce porcelain.
1996.010.068 Doll Platform Black lacquered wood platform, rectangular shape, carved front edge, hollow bottom, "gosho-ningyo" written in pencil inside bottom
1996.010.069 Doll Stuffed Cloth Doll A: Figure of girl with large round head and cylindrical body. Back of head covered with black cotton and face covered with white silk, black fiber hair hangs down straight at the back and in bangs at the front. The bun on top of head is tied with orange and white shibori scarf. Black felt eyes, red felt nose, painted brown eyebrows. Stick like neck joins head to body which is covered in white silk. The front and lower back is dressed in red kimono with yellow, white and purple plum blossoms and a green, gold and silver brocade obi. Arms are pipe cleaners, the bottom is covered turquoise cotton material. B: Haori jacket made of yellow silk crepe with red and green plaid design, the inner and outer sleeve edges are trimmed with red silk crepe. Collar is folded back and tied with red cotton band. Fabric is faded.
1996.010.070 Figures 2 Folk figures with removeable heads, painted molded or carved papier mache? (A & B) Female figure, H: 2.25", W: 1", D: 1.25", kneeling position, (a) head has short cropped black painted hair, brown skin, painted black wing shaped eyebrows, eyes, red painted mouth and cheeks, scowling expression, held to body with straight pin, (b) body in kneeling position with hands on knees, painted red vest, painted red checks on light green robe. (C & D) Male figure, H: 2", W: 1", D: 1.5", kneeling position, (a) head has painted light green hair, brown skin, black eyebrows, one eye closed, one white eye open, red cheeks, red lips pursed to one side, held to body with straight pin, (b) body in kneedling position with hands on knees, painted dark blue robe with white crosses.
1996.010.071 Figurine Set Wood Kokeshi Style Figurine Set - Ainu Original set consisted of two female Ainu figures with mortars and large pestle on a base. It appears a smaller Ainu couple was glued on after. Only one figure is adhered to the base and the other three are loose. A: Wood female figure with round swivel, painted black hair, eyebrows, eyes, tatoo around red lips, gray headband with gold trim, and white design; brown under collar, gray robe with black stripes and black collar and sleeve and hem edging with white traditional Ainu design, light brown sash around waist; painted yellow, white and red bead necklace around neck. A shaped wood pestle with rounded ends and narrow middle is pegged to the figure's shoulder, painted gray design in bands around top and bottom. Wood mortar in shape of a round container, half the size of the figure is adhered to the base next to her, has a gray, green and dark red painted design around the rim. The base is rectangular unfinished wood. B: Wood female figure with round swivel, painted black hair, eyebrows, eyes, white headband with red design; blue under collar, brown robe with white stripes and black collar and sleeve and hem edging with white traditional Ainu design, red sash around waist; painted yellow, white and red bead necklace around neck. A shaped wood pestle with rounded ends and narrow middle is pegged to the figure's shoulder, painted gray design in bands around top and bottom, bulge in middle. C: Wood female figure, H: 2.5", Diam: .75", painted and varnished, round swivel head, painted black hair and headdress with no top in brown with white designs, black painted hair, eyebrows, eyes, nose, green painted tatoo around red mouth. Brown painted robe with white painted designs representing applique, dark brown hem, neck and sleeve edges with white design, green sash, yellow and blue painted beads with gold painted medallion. D: Wood male figure, H: 2.75", Diam: .875", painted and varnished, round swivel head, painted black hair and brown hat in the shape of a band with black design, black painted wrinkles, eyebrows, eyes, nose, facial hair, brown mouth; reddish brown robe outlined in gold and gold pattern, with green edging with white design, green leaf design on both sides of robe, green sash, pink sword strap over shoulder with black design and painted black sword with white hilt. Varnish is chipped on the sword strap.
1996.010.072 Figurine Set Kokeshi style wood figure of 7 happy gods on platform, four figures are loose A: 3 painted wood figures glued to wood rectangular platform. "Bishamon", god of the North, war, glory; nodding round head, brown painted helmet with gold spikes and white rivets, painted black eyebrows, eyes, red dots for nose and mouth; painted black robe with brown collar, blue sleeves, gold clasp in front, tan belt, blue pants, painted yellow bow, gray sword. "Jurojin", god of longevity; nodding round head, painted red hat with yellow design, painted black eyebrows, eyes, nose, red mouth, white whiskers; painted blue robe with white dots and light blue collar with yellow outline and design; painted white crane with red crown, yellow bill at lower front. "Daikoku", god of wealth, riches; nodding round head, painted red short cap with gold design in front, light blue ring around bottom of cap, painted blue eyebrows, black eyes, nose, and sideburns, red mouth, painted red curliques on each side of his head; painted green robe with brown dots, painted brown miner's hammer in hand, painted large white sack over his shoulder. On upper part of platform is written in ink the names of the 7 happy gods: "Bishamon", "Jurojin", "Hotei", "Ebisu", "Daikoku", "Benzaiten", "Fukurokuju"; on the bottom is written in ink a description of the figures: "1. god of glory--warrior, 2. god of longevity, 3. children's patron saint, 4. god of plenty, 5. god of wealth, 6. goddess of great beauty, 7. god of good fortune, wisdom", "Georgia Sealoff, 1952"; written in pencil: "which is longer--head of F. or a spring day? No one can tell--both are so long" (referring to Fukurokuju and his tall forehead). B: "Hotei" H: 1.5", round nodding head, bald with red curliques on each side of head, painted black eyebrows, nose, eyes, red mouth, round body with bare chest, painted red robe with black collar, blue and white painted design. C: "Ebisu" (Yebisu), god of fishers and commerce, H: 1.75", round nodding head, bald with painted gold rounded cap with blue trim and chin strap, red curliques at both sides of head, gray eyebrows, black eyes, nose, red mouth; painted yellow robe, white bib-like garment showing in front and back, with brown sash, green skirt or pants, holding a painted red and gold fish. D: "Benzaiten" (Benten), H: 1.75", nodding round head with shaped topknot, painted black hair in a bun with pink and yellow hair decoration in front, 2 black dots on forehead, black eyes, nose, red mouth; painted peachy red robe with red dots and purple and white shawl, folded arms with yellow obi? with red dots showing above, holding something brown with white dots, purple trim on sleeves, brown patch with white hachi design in lower front. E: "Fukurokuju" H: 2", nodding egg shaped head, bald, painted gray forehead wrinkles, white eyebrows, black eyes, black nose, red mouth, white whiskers with grey streaks, red curliques on each side of head; painted blue robe with white dots, yellow underrobe, painted brown staff. 7 GODS OF HAPPINESS "Their origin has been traced back to the days of the Shogun Yemitsu, and the story is told that they were the outcome of a dream. Yemitsu awoke one morning on the first day of the year 1624 and his spirit was troubled. A famous courtier of the Shogun, the wise Dai Oino Kami persuaded his master that the seven monsters who had frightened him were none other than the disguised gods, the seven gods of happiness or good fortune, paying him a visit at the advent of a New Year. His cleverness convinced Yemitsu, and showed him a list borrowed from the divinities of the 3 religions: Shintoism, Buddhism and Taoism. Taoism: EBISU or YEBISU, god of the fishers, of commerce and of daily food***; Taoism: JUROJIN, god of longevity, round-headed, smiling, sometimes accompanied by a deer or stork, and FUKUROKUJU, god of wisdom, having a long head; Buddhism: BISHAMON, god of the North, god of war; DAIKOKU, god of riches, with money or rice-bag and a miner's hammer**; HOTEI, the fat-bellied, smiling god of contentment and gaiety, protector of children; BENTEN, goddess of beauty." From The ABC of Japanese Art by J.F. Blacker, p. 35, 36. "One of the many beliefs concerning the Seven Lucky Gods of Japan is that during the first 3 days of the NEW YEAR, they become sailors and command a magic ship called the TAKARABUNE, treasure ship. It is said that the gods steer the treasure ship from heaven into human ports every New Year's Eve. On the second eveing of the new year, it is the custom to place a picture of the seven gods on the treasure ship under one's pillow to induce "hatsuyume", lucky first dreams of the year. A lucky dream indicates that the remainder of the year will be fortunate for that individual, if he does not reveal the dreams to anyone! The seven gods are a group of deities, whose origins stem from Indian, Chinese, and indigenous Japanese gods of fortune. Each of the seven gods has been recognized as a deity for more than a thousand years. Through the years, the gods have been transformed from impersonal deities to warmer and more benevolent patrons of profession, arts, and skills. Which is your Patron God? JUROJIN: God of Wisdom--Accountants, administrators, astronomers, clerks, engineers, inventors, journalists, judges, mathematicians, politicians, philosophers, professors, scientists, secretaries, teachers BENTEN: Goddess of Art--Actors, artists, beauticians, composers, dancers, entertainers, gamblers, musicians, painters, photographes, sculptors, writers BISHAMON: God of Honor--Defender against evil, clergymen, missionaries, physicians, dentists, nurses DAIKOKU: God of Wealth, Patron Saint of Farmers--bankers, carpenters, craftsmen, farmers, gardeners, financiers** EBISU: God of Good Fortune, God of Fair Dealing--attorneys, executives, fishermen, housewives, merchants, sailors*** FUKUROKUJU: God of Longevity--Athletes, chess players, scientists HOTEI: God of Magnanimity, Symbol of Happy Life, Guardian of Children--Fortune tellers, bartenders, cooks" From The Seven Lucky Gods published by Charles E. Tuttle Co. (see excerpt in "Festival--Japan" file) ***EBISU-KO FESTIVAL Ebisu is one of the Seven Gods of Fortune in Japan. It is said that when the Eight Million Deities of Japan assembled at the great shrine of Izumo to discuss momentous affairs and arrange for the marriages of Japanese maidens in the 10th month (October), which therefore is literally called Kanna-tsuki or "godless month" in Japan, meaning that all the gods are absent at Izumo, Ebisu was too busy fishing to hear the summons, and he remained at large. Hence he is also the patron of fishermen, and his statue always carries a Tai (sea-bream) and a fishing rod. The Ebisu-Ko Festival is held annually on the 20th day of the 10th month, when the tradesmen have a special celebration and give entertainments to their customers. They visit the Ebisu shrines, of which the Imamiya shrine near Osaka, is best known, and make offerings in order to insure their share of good luck during the coming year. Every pious visitor of the ebisu Shrine carries home a green branch of bamboo to which are tied the gaily colored good-luck charms and talismans: red cardboard tai (sea-bream), a picture of Ebisu himself, tokens symbolizing wealth, such as gilt paper shaped like the old doban-coins, treasure chests, purses, money-bags, rice-bales, dice suggesting luck, a target with an arrow in the bullseye as an appeal for success in undertakings of all kinds. At home the statues of Ebisu are displayed on a stand, and various kinds of edibles are offered to him, Tai (sea-bream) being one of the most important offerings at this festival. The chrysanthemum, which is at its best in October (of the Gregorian calendar), is also offered on the stand. **THE "NEW YEAR'S EVE" OF DAIKOKU Daikoku, another of the Seven Gods of Fortune, is always associated with Ebisu. He is of Indian origin, and his name is a translation of the Indian word "Mahakala" (great colour). In some localities in Japan, the "New Year's Eve" of Daikoku is observed on the 9th of December. Then all the statues of Daikoku and Ebisu that are in the family are displayed on a stand on which are offered various kinds of fruit, vegetables and sweetmeats. A forked radish is indispensable at this festival." from "Calendar of the Floral and Festival Land of Japan" published by Fujiya Hotel, Miyanoshita, Japan, see October, 1992.62.1 in Archives file.
1996.010.073 Figurine Set Wood Figurine Set: Two people in Ox costumes playing drums A: Black painted carved wood, left one is taller, both have black head and torso, painted white ladder design with white dots on front, white flower dots on either side of head, 2 kanji characters on back of head "Kasuga" and below painted red flower with yellow center and green leaves, turquoise leaves on smaller flower, bottom has white black and red stripes, yellow patch on either side of figure, white circle with brown X beside the yellow; gold eyes, gold and red mouth and snout, tufts of white fiber hair on forehead, split bamboo horns, 2 split bamboo strips glued onto the back of each extending upward with white stripes painted on the front (the 2 on figure have come off); feet are painted white with gold sandal straps; holding round drum in front with red with pink flowers, green leaves and white striking surface, cut bamboo sticks extend out each side of drums. Both figures are glued to a painted black rectangular base. B & C: 2 split bamboo strips which were glued to the back of the right figure extending upward with white stripes painted on the front. Possibly connected with the celebration of the rice day festival.
1996.010.074 Figurine Set Model of Cormorant fishing from Ugi, Japan Pine cone figures in pine cone boats on a wood platform. On the left is a boat made of a split pine cone, one adult on left with pine cone body and round head with painted black hair, (painted face has rubbed off) holds a pole, two children on right with pine cone bodies and round heads with painted black hair and facial features, standing under a the top of a pine cone canopy held by two sticks with 5 red ball shaped lanterns with white markings hanging down; on the right is a split pine cone boat with wood projections at each end, on top are three pine cone figures, the two on the left are wearing eboshi black hats (one has a broken top), black hair (faces are worn off), each holding 5 strings that entend to the cormorants which are made of seeds and small branch like necks and heads; the figure on the right is larger and hold a pole; on the left end of the boat is a twig with a small pine cone and red cotton batting representing the fire from a torch. The boats and birds are glued to a painted base which is blue with white and yellow wave pattern. It is stored in a grey lidded cardboard box with a blue, green and white label with kanji: "Famous Gifu Souvenir to be given as present", also written in ink is "Ugi Cormorant Fishing".
1996.010.075 Dolls 3 Kokeshi style wood figures, old couple and baby (possibly refers to story of the Peach Boy, Momotaro) A: Old woman with a swivel head shaped like an egg with point in back with a knob for her bun, painted white hair with grey streaks in front and black bun cover with reddish brown dots in back, painted black forehead wrinkles, eyes, white eyebrows, nose, red mouth, painted cheek wrinkles; body is turned wood in shape of piece of bamboo with painted silver bamboo leaves outlined with black stalks in front. B: Old man with a swivel head shaped like an egg with point in back with a knob, painted white hair and reddish brown hat with black spots at back, grey forehead wrinkles, black eyes, white eyebrows, nose, mustache and beard, red mouth; body is turned wood in shape of piece of bamboo with painted gold bamboo leaves outlined with black stalks in front. C: Baby's head, pointed oval with black painted hair in front and sides, painted white, blue & red decoration in hair, 2 black dots on forehead, 2 red dots on either side of head (ears?), black eyes, white nose, red mouth, wood stem that fits into body. D: Baby's body, turned wood in shape of bamboo with a slanted top where head fits into hole, painted design on front of white plum blossoms with red center, grey branches, blue sky patches and gold round sun.
1996.010.076 Figures Pair of wood figures (Shogi peg for game) A: Round wood painted and varnished head with painted black hair on top with orange bow and on each side of head is black hair with 3 orange dots, painted black eyebrows, eyes, nose, red mouth; angular shaped upper and lower body blocks held by vertical dowel to wood platform, red painted kanji on the front of the body "Silver Knight, King", black squares painted on rectangular base, orange and white braided cord (kumihimo) tied in a bow around waist. B: Round wood painted and varnished head with painted black hair on top with green bow and on each side of head is black hair with 3 green dots, painted black eyebrows, eyes, nose, red mouth; angular shaped upper and lower body blocks held by vertical dowel to wood platform, black painted kanji "Golden Knight, King" on the front of the body, black squares painted on rectangular base, purple and white braided cord (kumihimo) tied in a bow around waist.
1996.010.077 Scrapbook of Kokeshi Dolls Scrapbook with information about Kokeshi Dolls Brown cover with a lighter brown rectangle surrounding a black diamond shape in the center of the front cover, back cover is plain, both have brown cloth reinforcing tape along spine edges and are tied together with a brown cord running through metal eyelets. Inside there are 40 construction paper pages (first page is loose) on which figures, cards, photographs, toothpick dolls and newspaper articles are glued. Inside front cover: 8 flat wood kokeshi shaped figures painted in different designs p. 1: 7 papers with printed pictures of kokeshi, 1 card with photograph of donor and group, written at bottom of page "Georgia Sealoff, Visiting Faculty, Japan Library School, Keio University, Tokyo, Japan, 1952-195.." p. 2: Tokyo Evening News, 10/26/53 3 news photos of kokeshi production p. 3,4: 4 cards with printed pictures of kokeshi, 2 news articles in Japanese, paper: Y. Yamada... p. 5: Photograph of kokeshi dolls, "Doll Collection of Georgia Sealoff (old style kokeshi)" p. 6: 3 news articles--Kanzashi Kokeshi (Yamagata Pref.), Yajiro Kokeshi (Miyagi Pref.), Japanese article by Takio Shikama p. 7: Photograph of kokeshi dolls, "Doll Collection of Georgia Sealoff (modern style kokeshi)" p. 8,9: 2 news articles, Photograph of kokeshi dolls, "Dolls of Georgia Sealoff" p. 10: Letter in Japanese "Yuundo, Yamada", 2 paper dolls--one with a toothpick doll inserted, 1 paper toothpick holder with a toothpick doll inserted, "Tothpick of Kokeshi Doll" p. 11: 3 envelopes with Japanese letters inside which have painted flowers p. 12: 1 paper in Japanese and 1 booklet on kokeshi in Japanese p. 13: 2 photographs of kokeshi dolls "Collections of Georgia Sealoff", Christmas card with flat padded kokeshi figures on front from Fumiko, empty envelope from Toshio Okabe, woodblock print card of 2 kokeshi figures "Merry Xmas, GLS" p. 14: 7 business cards from Kokeshi Doll Assn. people p. 15: 4 photographs: group at table, 2 of donor, kokeshi collection "Georgia Sealoff attends monthly meeting", booklet in Japanese with donor's photograph p. 16: Lined paper with Tokyo Kokeshi Friendship Association meeting agenda in pencil, card in Japanese p. 17: Photograph of children in traditional dress looking at 2 giant paper mache kokeshi dolls, 3 pamphlet pages and 1 news article in Japanese with pictures of kokeshi and their makers "Naruko spring, Miyagi Pref.", small kokeshi envelope inserted p. 18: 3 writing papers with handpainted kokeshi figures p. 19: 4 writing papers and envelopes, 1 bookmark with handpainted or block printed kokeshi figures, news article "...T.B. Seals..." with picture of kokeshi doll "Nippon 1952" p. 20,21: 4 cards with kokeshi figures; 3 cards, 3 bookmarks with kokeshi figures p. 22,23: 8 cards with kokeshi figures p. 24,25: 3 envelopes, 1 card, 6 bookmarks with kokeshi figures p. 26: Book advertisement, paper in Japanese, pencilled meeting agenda p. 27: Seattle Times Pictorial supplement with article "Japanese Tolk Toys Tell History Lesson" featuring donor p. 28: News article "Lifelike Folk Dolls, rice paper printed in Japanese p. 29: Letter to Mr. Nishida outlining donor's kokeshi research, and translation from Mr. Kagayama p. 30,31: Meeting notices, article in Japanese, letter from Kenjin Yamada p. 32,33: Newspaper articles in Japanese p. 34: Photograph of children in traditional dress looking at 2 giant paper mache kokeshi figures, 2 cards with woodblock printed kokeshi figures p. 35: Letter in Japanese, 2 photographs of Japanese mask collection, kokeshi shaped card inserted p. 36,37: 3 samples of wrapping paper with kokeshi p. 38,39: 10 cards with kokeshi figures (1 loose) p. 40,41: 3 paper napkins, 3 samples of stamps with kokeshi figures p. 42,43: 5 cards with kokeshi figures p. 44,45: 4 Japanese booklets with kokeshi figures p. 46,47: 5 cards (4 with padded figures), envelope containing 5 paper stencils and numerous stencilled squares with kokeshi figures p. 48,49: 1 card, 1 paper wrapper, 3 bookmarks, 2 news articles and 1 silkscreened card with kokeshi figures p. 50,51: 2 photographs or donor with kimono clad women with parasols and with paper mache ox (used in Seattle Times) p. 52,53: 2 photographs: daruma and wooden horses p. 54,55: Paper "children who won prizes for parade at kokeshi festival...", Northwest Orient Air: "Story of Kokeshi Dolls" p. 56,57: "Pictorial map of Japan" by Radio Japan, 2 articles on "Kokeshi Doll" p. 58,59: 3 cards with kokeshi figures In envelope attached to last page: 17 articles in Japanese with kokeshi figures labelled "Kokeshi and Folk arts research bulletins"
1996.010.078 Dolls Kokeshi Doll Couple A: Painted and varnished wood female doll with round swivel head, painted black hair with bangs in front, back of head has pink hachi pattern with red dots indicating a scarf, black eyebrows, eyes, nose, red mouth; round body with pedestal bottom, painted red jacket with collar which matches the scarf, floral patterned blouse, black sash, red, grey and black striped pants in front, painted red patches on pedestal indicates shoes. On bottom written in pencil is the number 7 and a Japanese character. B: Painted and varnished wood male doll with round swivel head, painted black hair in front, back of head has light blue hachi pattern with dark blue dots indicating a scarf, black eyebrows, eyes, nose, red mouth; round body with pedestal bottom, painted green jacket with collar which matches the scarf, blue floral patterned blouse, black sash, dark red, grey and black striped pants in front, painted black patches on pedestal indicates shoes. KOKESHI DOLLS: "Kokeshi are said to have originated in the Tohoku region in the hands of the lathe-craftsmen who lived a gypsy life in the mountains of that region, seeking good wood material for their craft. Eventually, about the middle of the Edo Period, these craftsmen settled down near the many spas that abounded in that region, and began to make...kokeshi...may be related to the household god." from p. 26, The Folk Toys of Japan by Misako Shishido "They date from the late Edo period when both leisure time and affluence in farming communities became not just a sought-after dream. Essentially a doll, the kokeshi are believed to have their origins in the practice of spiritualist religion... Sumptuary laws surely had a creativehand in the first kokeshi's form taking. Probably it was a roughly human form turned on a handpowered wood lathe...Each is made from a single piece? of finely turned and finished hardwood. Wood varies widely but the most generally used type is the native dogwood which is both fine-grained and light in tone...Probably the most well-known, Naruko-no-kokeshi come from a small community located in the northwest of the prefecture and is one of main entry points for Kurikoma National Park. An abundance of hot springs makes kokeshi turning all the more lucrative a winter pastime." p. 21, Mingei: Japan's Enduring Folk Arts by Amaury Saint-Gilles "The old style dolls were first crafted more than 300 years ago, perhaps during the Tokugawa Shogunate period. They are all female, and never include arms, legs, hands or feet. They are considered a "cottage" industry during the long winter months of the Tohoku district of Japan: Yamagata, Aomori, Miyagi, Fukushima and Akita Prefectures in Norther part of Honshu Island. While her huspand held the knife to whittle the long slim body with a round head, the wife pulled the pulley on the turning lathe mechanism which produced a gutteral sound pronounced as "kokeshi". Sizes vary from 1/2 inch to 5 feet tall. Each doll maker with dyes and paint would imbue his dolls with certain facial expressions, hair style, and a design of kimono and obi. He placed his signature on the bottom of each day's output. The skills and designs were passed down from one generation to the next, so a collector can identify them by prefecture, district, village and maker. The Naruka Hot Springs area of Miyagi Prefecture has developed a thriving village industry since 1945. They use modern equipment for the carving and employ many people to paint. The new style competes with the old style in popularity there. The new style kokeshi dolls reflect the coeducation movement in modern Japan. Boy and girl dolls sold in pairs became popular and have been mass produced and exported all over the world. Characters out of folktales and literature are available...Almost all of the modern dolls have moveable heads. Only Yamagata old-style dolls have moveable heads. Old-style doll collectors in Japan have formed a national society organization which promotes the study of the art. Many of the members are well-to-do artists, scholars, and business people. They visit the more remote mountain villages, buying, exchanging and publish their findings and photos in scholarly journals. It was my privilege to become an honorary member during 1952-54." Georgia Sealoff (donor)
1996.010.079 Doll Wood Kokeshi Doll (older, detailed style) Round swivel head with a knob, painted black hair with a red and white dot hair decoration, two red patches on forehead beside bangs, painted black eyebrows, eyes, nose, red mouth; body is painted with red and gold kimono, white under collar, haori with design of red and green maple leaves and black collar, light blue obi with white chrysanthemum and red leaf, red obi jime and pink obi age, apron with red leaves and green and white triangular patch near bottom. On bottom is written black ink kanji: "Made by Akimoto Hachi" KOKESHI DOLLS: "Kokeshi are said to have originated in the Tohoku region in the hands of the lathe-craftsmen who lived a gypsy life in the mountains of that region, seeking good wood material for their craft. Eventually, about the middle of the Edo Period, these craftsmen settled down near the many spas that abounded in that region, and began to make...kokeshi...may be related to the household god." from p. 26, The Folk Toys of Japan by Misako Shishido "They date from the late Edo period when both leisure time and affluence in farming communities became not just a sought-after dream. Essentially a doll, the kokeshi are believed to have their origins in the practice of spiritualist religion... Sumptuary laws surely had a creativehand in the first kokeshi's form taking. Probably it was a roughly human form turned on a handpowered wood lathe...Each is made from a single piece? of finely turned and finished hardwood. Wood varies widely but the most generally used type is the native dogwood which is both fine-grained and light in tone...Probably the most well-known, Naruko-no-kokeshi come from a small community located in the northwest of the prefecture and is one of main entry points for Kurikoma National Park. An abundance of hot springs makes kokeshi turning all the more lucrative a winter pastime." p. 21, Mingei: Japan's Enduring Folk Arts by Amaury Saint-Gilles "The old style dolls were first crafted more than 300 years ago, perhaps during the Tokugawa Shogunate period. They are all female, and never include arms, legs, hands or feet. They are considered a "cottage" industry during the long winter months of the Tohoku district of Japan: Yamagata, Aomori, Miyagi, Fukushima and Akita Prefectures in Norther part of Honshu Island. While her huspand held the knife to whittle the long slim body with a round head, the wife pulled the pulley on the turning lathe mechanism which produced a gutteral sound pronounced as "kokeshi". Sizes vary from 1/2 inch to 5 feet tall. Each doll maker with dyes and paint would imbue his dolls with certain facial expressions, hair style, and a design of kimono and obi. He placed his signature on the bottom of each day's output. The skills and designs were passed down from one generation to the next, so a collector can identify them by prefecture, district, village and maker. The Naruka Hot Springs area of Miyagi Prefecture has developed a thriving village industry since 1945. They use modern equipment for the carving and employ many people to paint. The new style competes with the old style in popularity there. The new style kokeshi dolls reflect the coeducation movement in modern Japan. Boy and girl dolls sold in pairs became popular and have been mass produced and exported all over the world. Characters out of folktales and literature are available...Almost all of the modern dolls have moveable heads. Only Yamagata old-style dolls have moveable heads. Old-style doll collectors in Japan have formed a national society organization which promotes the study of the art. Many of the members are well-to-do artists, scholars, and business people. They visit the more remote mountain villages, buying, exchanging and publish their findings and photos in scholarly journals. It was my privilege to become an honorary member during 1952-54." Georgia Sealoff (donor)
1996.010.080 Doll Wood Kokeshi Doll Round swivel head with painted black hair on top and sides with red dots, black eyebrows, eyes, nose, red mouth; taiko drum shaped body with painted set of 3 red stripes at top and bottom and black bamboo leaves alternating with green pine clusters. Hole in bottom and "Japan" stamped beside it. Representing a jizo sama (memorial for a child) KOKESHI DOLLS: "Kokeshi are said to have originated in the Tohoku region in the hands of the lathe-craftsmen who lived a gypsy life in the mountains of that region, seeking good wood material for their craft. Eventually, about the middle of the Edo Period, these craftsmen settled down near the many spas that abounded in that region, and began to make...kokeshi...may be related to the household god." from p. 26, The Folk Toys of Japan by Misako Shishido "They date from the late Edo period when both leisure time and affluence in farming communities became not just a sought-after dream. Essentially a doll, the kokeshi are believed to have their origins in the practice of spiritualist religion... Sumptuary laws surely had a creativehand in the first kokeshi's form taking. Probably it was a roughly human form turned on a handpowered wood lathe...Each is made from a single piece? of finely turned and finished hardwood. Wood varies widely but the most generally used type is the native dogwood which is both fine-grained and light in tone...Probably the most well-known, Naruko-no-kokeshi come from a small community located in the northwest of the prefecture and is one of main entry points for Kurikoma National Park. An abundance of hot springs makes kokeshi turning all the more lucrative a winter pastime." p. 21, Mingei: Japan's Enduring Folk Arts by Amaury Saint-Gilles "The old style dolls were first crafted more than 300 years ago, perhaps during the Tokugawa Shogunate period. They are all female, and never include arms, legs, hands or feet. They are considered a "cottage" industry during the long winter months of the Tohoku district of Japan: Yamagata, Aomori, Miyagi, Fukushima and Akita Prefectures in Norther part of Honshu Island. While her huspand held the knife to whittle the long slim body with a round head, the wife pulled the pulley on the turning lathe mechanism which produced a gutteral sound pronounced as "kokeshi". Sizes vary from 1/2 inch to 5 feet tall. Each doll maker with dyes and paint would imbue his dolls with certain facial expressions, hair style, and a design of kimono and obi. He placed his signature on the bottom of each day's output. The skills and designs were passed down from one generation to the next, so a collector can identify them by prefecture, district, village and maker. The Naruka Hot Springs area of Miyagi Prefecture has developed a thriving village industry since 1945. They use modern equipment for the carving and employ many people to paint. The new style competes with the old style in popularity there. The new style kokeshi dolls reflect the coeducation movement in modern Japan. Boy and girl dolls sold in pairs became popular and have been mass produced and exported all over the world. Characters out of folktales and literature are available...Almost all of the modern dolls have moveable heads. Only Yamagata old-style dolls have moveable heads. Old-style doll collectors in Japan have formed a national society organization which promotes the study of the art. Many of the members are well-to-do artists, scholars, and business people. They visit the more remote mountain villages, buying, exchanging and publish their findings and photos in scholarly journals. It was my privilege to become an honorary member during 1952-54." Georgia Sealoff (donor)
1996.010.081 Doll Wood Kokeshi Doll Immovable drum shaped head, painted red petal shapes on top of head and sides, black bangs and side pieces, black eyebrows, eyes, pointed black nose, red dot for mouth; body is bullet shaped with two red stripes around top and bottom and down front 3 pine tree motifs (faded). On bottom is black ink kanji which is difficult to read.
1996.010.082 Doll Wood Kokeshi Doll Immovable drum shaped head with painted red petal shapes on top and black hair pieces on back, sides and bangs, red ear? marks, black eyebrows, eyes, u-shaped nose, red dot for mouth; cylinder shaped body with painted red dot near top front and red peony underneath with black outline and yellow and black center. (Dent in back of body) Black kanji on bottom "Obayashi __ Taro" (not very readable). KOKESHI DOLLS: "Kokeshi are said to have originated in the Tohoku region in the hands of the lathe-craftsmen who lived a gypsy life in the mountains of that region, seeking good wood material for their craft. Eventually, about the middle of the Edo Period, these craftsmen settled down near the many spas that abounded in that region, and began to make...kokeshi...may be related to the household god." from p. 26, The Folk Toys of Japan by Misako Shishido "They date from the late Edo period when both leisure time and affluence in farming communities became not just a sought-after dream. Essentially a doll, the kokeshi are believed to have their origins in the practice of spiritualist religion... Sumptuary laws surely had a creativehand in the first kokeshi's form taking. Probably it was a roughly human form turned on a handpowered wood lathe...Each is made from a single piece? of finely turned and finished hardwood. Wood varies widely but the most generally used type is the native dogwood which is both fine-grained and light in tone...Probably the most well-known, Naruko-no-kokeshi come from a small community located in the northwest of the prefecture and is one of main entry points for Kurikoma National Park. An abundance of hot springs makes kokeshi turning all the more lucrative a winter pastime." p. 21, Mingei: Japan's Enduring Folk Arts by Amaury Saint-Gilles "The old style dolls were first crafted more than 300 years ago, perhaps during the Tokugawa Shogunate period. They are all female, and never include arms, legs, hands or feet. They are considered a "cottage" industry during the long winter months of the Tohoku district of Japan: Yamagata, Aomori, Miyagi, Fukushima and Akita Prefectures in Norther part of Honshu Island. While her huspand held the knife to whittle the long slim body with a round head, the wife pulled the pulley on the turning lathe mechanism which produced a gutteral sound pronounced as "kokeshi". Sizes vary from 1/2 inch to 5 feet tall. Each doll maker with dyes and paint would imbue his dolls with certain facial expressions, hair style, and a design of kimono and obi. He placed his signature on the bottom of each day's output. The skills and designs were passed down from one generation to the next, so a collector can identify them by prefecture, district, village and maker. The Naruka Hot Springs area of Miyagi Prefecture has developed a thriving village industry since 1945. They use modern equipment for the carving and employ many people to paint. The new style competes with the old style in popularity there. The new style kokeshi dolls reflect the coeducation movement in modern Japan. Boy and girl dolls sold in pairs became popular and have been mass produced and exported all over the world. Characters out of folktales and literature are available...Almost all of the modern dolls have moveable heads. Only Yamagata old-style dolls have moveable heads. Old-style doll collectors in Japan have formed a national society organization which promotes the study of the art. Many of the members are well-to-do artists, scholars, and business people. They visit the more remote mountain villages, buying, exchanging and publish their findings and photos in scholarly journals. It was my privilege to become an honorary member during 1952-54." Georgia Sealoff (donor)
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